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This page for confirmed sessions is being updated frequently. Some revisions are being made continuously with feedback from the session co-organizers. You may please keep updated! Last Update 25.12.2023

The Co-Organizers, Confirmed Sessions, and Session Chairs/Moderators

Vortex Matter, Dynamics, and Pinning

The Session will continue its tradition from the previous ICSM Conferences to bring together various aspects, both theoretical and experimental, from vortex matter, dynamics and pinning, vortex visualization, etc. The session will also include contributions regarding vortices in relation to meso-and nano-structures, nanotechnology of pinning centers, and any other aspect related to vortex matter.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Artificial Pinning in Superconductors
  • Magnetic Vortex Dynamics
  • Vortex Dynamics in Superconductors
  • Vortex Matter: Fundamental Properties and Simulations
  • Vortices and Nanostructured Superconductors
Session Organizer/Moderator
Adrian Crisan

Adrian Crisan obtained his M.Sc in Physics at the University of Bucharest in 1985, Ph.D. in 1994 at the Institute of Atomic Physics Bucharest, and D.Sc. in 2013 at the University of Birmingham U.K. Worked at NMP Bucharest, Univ Rome (1988-1989), AIST Tsukuba Japan (2000-2002 and 2006), Unıv Bath (2002-2004) and Univ. Birmingham, UK (2007-2015). He has won a NATO/Royal Society Fellowship in UK and, STA/JSPS short-term, long-term, and invitational fellowship in Japan. He has won the prestigious Marie Curie Excellence Grant on a proposal regarding artificial pinning in HTS films forming and leading an MC team at Birmingham Univ. He has published over 150 papers with over 1000 citations, 3 chapters in books, edited the book’ Vortices and Nanostructured Superconductors at Springer, and presented a large number of invited and contributed talks at international conferences. Now Senior Scientist working at NMP Bucharest.

Invited speakers include:

Adrian Crisan (National Institute for Materials Physics, Romania)
Simon Bending (University of Bath, UK)
Gianluca Ghigo (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
Enrico Silva (Università Roma Tre, Italy)
Milorad Milosevic (University of Antwerpen, Belgium)
Massimiliano Polichetti (Universita di Salerno, Italy)
Gaia Grimaldi (CNR-SPIN Italy)
Charles Reichhardt (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA)
Tomasz Cichorek (Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland)
Armando Galluzzi (University of Salerno, Italy)

Abstract IDs: 

[1023],[1285],[1175],[1285],[1285],[1282],[1285],[1059],[1064],[1133],[1369],[1348],[1060],[1114],[1233],[1017],[1116],[1165],[1256],[1269],[1074]

Topological and Unconventional Superconductivity in Low-Dimensional Magnet-Superconductor Hybrid Systems

One of the major challenges for the future of quantum computation is the drastic reduction of the error rate associated with quantum decoherence phenomena. Robust topological qubits, as realized by Majorana states, may ultimately provide a solution and constitute a new direction of topological quantum computation. However, unambiguous identification of Majorana states requires well-defined model-type platforms.

Magnet-superconductor hybrid (MSH) systems provide the most promising platforms for realizing unconventional types of superconductivity. The Session will focus on recent exciting developments in the theoretical prediction and understanding of topological superconductivity and associated zero-energy Majorana modes as well as experimental breakthroughs based on advanced nanofabrication techniques for realizing well-defined magnet-superconductor hybrid systems. Potential applications for topological quantum computation will be discussed, taking into account recent progress regarding concepts and the design of devices based on topologically protected qubits.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

 

• Nanofabrication of magnet-superconductor hybrid (MSH) systems
• Measurement tools for probing topological band structures
• Topological phase diagrams of MSH systems
• Emergence of Majorana zero modes in MSH systems
• Concepts for braiding Majorana modes
• Design of topologically protected qubits
• Future of topological quantum computation

Session Organizer/Moderator
Roland Wiesendanger

Roland Wiesendanger is a professor of Experimental Physics at the University of Hamburg. His scientific interests include nanomagnetism and nanospintronics, unconventional superconductivity, and topological physics. Since the end of the eighties, Roland Wiesendanger pioneered the technique of Spin-Polarized Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (SP-STM) which allowed the first real-space observation of magnetic structures at the atomic level, leading to numerous discoveries of novel types of magnetic states and phenomena in low-dimensional systems. Roland Wiesendanger published more than 650 scientific articles, review papers, and book chapters which have been cited more than 40.000 times. He is the author of two textbooks and editor of nine books and eight conference proceedings. He has given 600 invited talks at international conferences, universities, and research institutes. He is a member of numerous scientific societies and has received numerous prizes and awards.

 

Invited speakers include:

Dirk Morr (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA)
Levente Rozsa (Wigner Institute, Budapest, Hungary)
Ioannis Ioannidis (University of Hamburg, Germany)
Roberto Lo Conte (Universiy of Groningen,Netherlands)
Javad Shabani (Center for Quantum Information Physics (CQIP), USA)

Abstract IDs: 

[1167],[1047],[1043],[203],[1140],[1332]

Bulk Superconductors

This session will be centered on the various preparation techniques and procedures, the characterizations, and the possible applications of superconducting materials when they are considered in bulk form.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Bulk superconductors
  • High-Tc Cuprates
  • Superconducting Materials Processing and Structural Properties
  • Thermal, Magnetic and Electrical Properties of Superconductors
Session Organizer/Moderator
S. Barış Güner

S. Baris Guner is an associate professor of the Recep Tayyip Erdogan University (RTEU) in Turkey since February 2021. He received Ph.D. degree from RTEU in Rize in 2017. During the PhD thesis, he worked with many superconducting groups from the Brunel University, the University of Cambridge, the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, etc. He received the Academic Encouragement Prize of RTEU in Turkey in 2017. He has published papers focus on REBCO Bulk Superconductors, Single Grain and Multiseeded Superconducting Materials Processing, Magnetic Levitation, Trapped Field and Structural Properties. Details about his research activities can be found here https://avesis.erdogan.edu.tr/sbaris.guner/yayinlar

Invited speakers include:

Xin Yao (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)
Pavel Diko (Slovak Academy of Sciences, Slovakia)
Philippe Vanderbemden (University of Liege, Belgium)

Abstract IDs: 

[1065],[1146],[1085],[1307],[1310],[1328],[1331],[1322]

MgB2 – Materials and Applications

MgB2 is expected to be used in helium-free conditions at around 20K, which can easily be attained by a cryo-cooler or liquid hydrogen. The ignorable weak link in the form of grain coupling suggests that the MgB2 fabrication process is simpler than that of HTS superconductors. However, the critical current properties of MgB2 bulks, tapes, and wires still do not reach the level of practical applications due to low density, the inclusion of impurity phases, oxidation of constituent elements and so on. The purpose of the session is to understand the present status of MgB2 and to discuss the improvement of current-carrying characteristics for the wide range of applications of MgB2. Wire production using in-situ and ex-situ methods, the techniques PIT, CTFF, and IMD will also be debated in view of Jc enhancement and persistent current joints. Permanent Magnets made of bulks and their modeling and applications will be included.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Fabrication of bulks, thin films, wire and tapes
• Microstructure and critical current densities
• Flux pinning
• AC loss
• Mechanical properties
• Applications
• Joints fabrication and physics

Session Organizer/Moderator
Akiyasu Yamamoto & Hiroaki Kumakura

Akiyasu Yamamoto has been an associate professor at the Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology since 2015. He obtained his B.E., M.E., and Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo. In 2017, he received the Award of Young Scientists from the Minister of MEXT, Japan. He has published papers focused on the realization of MgB2 conductors by advanced processing techniques in addition to Permanent magnet with MgB2 bulk for magnetic applications.

 

 

Hiroaki Kumakura was born in 1952. He obtained his B.E.(1976) and M.E.(1978) from the University of Tokyo. He was a director at Superconducting Materials Center (2005-2011), National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), professor at Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (2007-2013). He is now a Special Researcher in NIMS, President of the Cryogenics and Superconductivity Society of Japan, and a Professor Emeritus, at the University of Tsukuba. He has been engaged in the development of wires and tapes of various superconductors, such as Nb3Al, Bi-based oxides, MgB2, and iron pnictides.

Invited speakers include:

Takahiro Kondo (University of Tsukuba, Japan)
Akihiro Kikuchi (National Institute for Materials Science, Japan)
Dongliang Wang (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)

Abstract IDs: 

[1036],[1155],[1046],[1111]

Superconductors Under Extreme Conditions of Pressure and Strain

Superconductivity is among the most fascinating and well-studied quantum states of matter. Almost 8 years passed after discovering 200K superconductivity in the highly compressed hydrogen sulfide. There are many theoretical works for not only the explanation of superconductivity but for other candidates of superconductors at high pressure. Despite over 100 years of research, a detailed understanding of how features of the normal-state electronic structure determine superconducting properties has remained elusive. For instance, the ability to deterministically enhance the superconducting transition temperature by design, rather than by serendipity, has been a long sought-after goal in condensed matter physics and materials science, but achieving this objective may require new tools, techniques, and approaches. In this session, the recent investigation in both experimental and theoretical studies will be discussed.  This session is dedicated to all kinds of superconductors in both experimental and theoretical studies to elucidate the understanding of superconductivity transition.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Synthesis and Characterization of hydrides
• Theoretical prediction and design of high-Tc Superconductor
• Technical investigation in extreme conditions with pressure and strain for hydrides
• Studies of other superconducting materials with pressure and strain

 

Session Organizer/Moderator
Rustem Khasanov

Rustem Khasanov studied physics at Kazan State University (Russia). He received his Ph.D. at the Physics Institute of the University of Zürich in 2004, where he worked in the group of Prof. Hugo Keller and Nobel Prize Laureate Prof. Alex Müller. Following two-year postdoctoral research at the Ames Laboratory (USA), in 2008 he joined the Laboratory for the muon spin spectroscopy at the Paul Scherrer Institute (Swityerland). His current research interest focuses on the muon spin rotation/relaxation studies of emergent electronic materials and physical phenomena under high-pressure extreme conditions. He has published over 290 peer-reviewed journal papers with over than 8000 cittions.

Invited speakers include:

Elena Gati (Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids Dresden, Germany)
Zurab Guguchia (Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland)
Vadim Grinenko (Institute of Solid State and Materials Physics, Germany)
Hans-Henning Klauss (Institute of Solid State and Materials Physics, Germany)
Sergey Bud’ko (Iowa State University of Science and Technology, USA)
Gianrico Lamura (CNR – SuPerconducting and other INnovative materials and devices institute, Italy)
Valentin Tafour (UC Davis Department of Physics and Astronomy, USA)
Ryosuke Akashi (National Institutes for Quantum Science and Technology, Japan)

Abstract IDs: 

[1079],[1306],[1072],[1073],[1343],[1235],[1119],[1201],[1189],[1214]

Superconductivity in Lower Dimension

The continuing miniaturization of a broad range of devices, gadgets, and electronic schemes creates new challenges and demands a deeper understanding of different aspects of charge and heat transport as well as fluctuation phenomena in a variety of superconducting nanostructures. Already now such structures constitute central elements of many nanodevices, and in the future, a number of their applications in metrology, informatics, electronics, etc. is expected to grow further. In addition, reaching a better understanding of salient features of superconductivity in lower dimensions belongs to the scope of most fundamental problems of modern condensed matter physics. The session is intended to bring together leading scientists actively working in different sub-fields of low dimensional superconductivity to overview the present status of the field and most recent advances, visualize further research prospects, and promote new collaborations.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Quantum phase slips in superconducting nanowires
• Superconductor-insulator quantum phase transitions
• Superconducting qubits and metamaterials
• Superconductivity and thermoelectric effects
• Topological insulators and Majorana fermions
• Crossed Andreev reflection and Cooper pair splitting

Session Organizer/Moderator
Andrei Zaikin

Professor Zaikin is a world-renowned expert in the theory of superconductivity, quantum nanotransport, quantum dissipation, and quantum decoherence. He graduated from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1979 and obtained his PhD in theoretical physics in 1983 from P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute in Moscow where he also continued his scientific career. Starting in 1995 he was permanently working in Germany for Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), a merger of Karlsruhe University and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. A.D. Zaikin is also a PI at the I.E. Tamm Theory Department of P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute and a research professor at the National Research University Higher School of Economics in Moscow, Russia.

Invited speakers include:

Andrei Zaikin (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany)
Alexandr Latyshev (Geneva University, Switzerland)
Andrew G. Semenov (Lebedev Institute, Moscow)
Alexei Radkevich (Lebedev Institute, Moscow, Russia)
Detlef Beckmann (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany)
Vadim Khrapai (Institute for Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, Russia)

Abstract IDs: 

[1104],[1068],[1080],[1184],[1206],[1317],[1318],[1329],[209],[233]

Effects of Topology in Superconductor Nanoarchitectures

Current challenges and prospect directions of fundamental and applied research in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism in 3D nanoarchitectures will be represented. Experimental techniques for the fabrication and characterization of 3D superconductors and magnetic elements at the nanoscale will be discussed followed by reviewing representative effects in the dynamics of topological modes therein. The broad topical scope of the Session will embrace, in particular, additive manufacturing of advanced superconducting materials; nanopillars in copper-oxide superconductors; 3D superconductor nanoarchitectures using van der Waals structures; vortex dynamics in ferromagnet/superconductor bilayers; spin-wave and vortex dynamics in 3D nanomembranes; cryogenic magnon fluxonics, 2D and 3D nanobridges as building blocks for new device concepts; hybrid Josephson junctions and nanodevices for quantum hardware. The perspectives of magnetic 3D architectures are aligned along: curvilinear magnetism; fabrication of curvilinear and 3D magnetic architectures, advanced characterization of 3D magnetic architectures, curvilinear architectures with complex magnetic ordering (ferromagnets and antiferromagnets) and magnetization dynamics in 3D magnetic architectures.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Superconductivity in 2D and 3D structures
  • Advanced fabrication methods
  • Magnetic flux and spin transport
  • Superconductivity in curved geometries
  • Topological modes in 3D nanoarchitectures
  • Theoretical description and numerical modeling
  • Chaos and ordering of the vortex motion
  • Superconductor-based hybrid structures
  • Curvilinear magnetism: fundamentals and perspectives
  • Geometrically curved, skin-conformal and self-healable magnetoelectronics
  • Fabrication of curvilinear and 3D magnetic architectures
  • Advanced characterization of 3D magnetic architectures
  • Curvilinear architectures with complex magnetic ordering (ferromagnets and antiferromagnets)
  • Magnetization dynamics in 3D magnetic architectures
Session Organizer/Moderator
Vladimir M. Fomin, Alessio Zaccone and Rosa Cordoba

Vladimir M. Fomin received his Ph.D. from the Moldova State University in 1978 and Dr. habil. from the Academy of Sciences of Moldova in 1990. Since 1991 Professor in Theoretical Physics at the Moldova State University (Chişinău, Republic of Moldova). Since 2009 Research Professor at the Institute for Integrative Nanosciences (IIN), Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden (Germany). Awards: State Prize of Moldova 1987. Diploma of a Scientific Discovery of the Phenomenon of the Propagation of Spatially-Extended Interface Phonon Polaritons in Composite Superlattices (Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, 1999). Medal “Academician P. L. Kapitsa” (Academy of Natural Sciences of Russia, 2000). Honorary Member of the Academy of Sciences of Moldova (2007). Scientific interests: theory of strain-induced self-rolled nanoarchitectures, topological effects in quantum rings and curved 3D micro-and nanoarchitectures, phase boundaries and vortex matter in micro-and nanoarchitectures and patterned superconductors, superconducting properties of metallic nanograins, phonons, vibrational excitations and polaronic effects in nanostructures, topological states of light and spin-orbit coupling in microcavities, optical properties of quantum dots, thermoelectric properties of semiconductor nanostructures, surface-induced magnetic anisotropy in mesoscopic systems of dilute magnetic alloys.

Born in 1981, after a PhD at ETH Zurich he has been on the faculty of the Technical University of Munich, the University of Cambridge, and the University of Milan. In 2011 with his student E. Scossa-Romano he analytically solved the elasticity problem of random sphere packings and elastic random networks. Later he developed an equation (Krausser, Samwer, Zaccone PNAS 2015) for the viscosity of liquids and a molecular-level theory of the glass transition based on thermoelasticity, the latter with E. Terentjev. With K. Trachenko, he discovered and mathematically predicted that the low-frequency shear modulus of liquids scales with the inverse cubic power of the (sub-millimeter) confinement length, a law that has been observed experimentally in many different systems. More recently, he has developed the anharmonic theory of phonon-mediated superconductivity, which extends the BCS theory to materials with anharmonicity, and disorder and to high-pressure materials.

Dr. ROSA CORDOBA did a PhD thesis in Material Science obtained in 2013.  Her current research interests focus on the nanofabrication of advanced materials in the three dimensions of space by using focused beams of electrons or ions (Ga+, Ne+ and He+). She has carried out novel studies on the composition and microstructure of the nanostructures at the nanoscale, as well as on their magnetotransport properties. Such advanced nanomaterials could be used as building blocks for a future generation of nano-electronic devices. She is a co‐author of 47 publications in research journals and 7 book chapters and, its total number of citations is 941. Her H‐index is 18. She has participated in 47 national or international conferences/workshops, in which she has given 20 oral communications, 6 of them were invited oral contributions.

Invited speakers include:

Giovanni Ummarino (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
Alexander Wietek (MPI Dresden,Germany)
Isabel Guillamón (Universidad Autonoma Madrid, Spain)
María José Pérez Martinez (CSIC, Zaragoza, Spain)
Anna Palau (CSIC, Barcelona, Spain)
María José Calderon (ICMM, Madrid, Spain)
Wolfgang Lang (University of Vienna, Austria)
Joris van de Vondel (KU Leuven, Belgium)
Dirk Grundler (EPFL Switzerland)
Yonathan Anahory (Hebrew Uni Jerusalem, Israel)
Alejandro Silhanek (Uni Liége, Belgium)
Thomas Schmidt (Université du Luxembourg, Luxembourg)
Alexander Kordyuk (Institute for Metal Physics of the N.A.S., Ukraine)
Alexei Semenov (DLR Berlin, Germany)
Elina Zhakina (Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Germany)

Abstract IDs: 

[1041],[1069],[1122],[1142],[1149],[1150],[1169],[1202],[1211],[1222],[1254],[1286],[1296],[1300],[1303]

Nonuniform Magnetic Textures

Nonuniform magnetic textures have attracted significant attention due to their interesting properties when subjected to external stimuli such as magnetic fields or currents. In this session we focus on recent experimental advances on Skyrmions, Domain Walls and other Spin Textures, e.g. hopfions, on their Micromagnetic and Atomistic Modeling, as well as soft X-Ray based imaging techniques for the direct observation of nonuniform magnetization states.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Skyrmions and Antiskyrmions
  • Magnetization Dynamics of Spin Textures
  • X-Ray imaging techniques
  • Time-Resolved X-Ray Microscopy
  • Micromagnetic Modeling
  • Atomistic Modeling
  • Theory of Magnetism
  • Domain Walls and their dynamics
  • Stripe and Helical states
Session Organizer/Moderator
Sebastian Wintz – Sabri Koraltan

Sabri Koraltan studied and started his academic career at the University of Vienna in Vienna, Austria at the department for physics of functional materials. His main scientific interests are magnetic skyrmions for sensing and storage concepts, artificial spin systems as well as magnetic multilayers for functional devices.

 

 

 

Sebastian Wintz received his PhD (Dr. rer. nat.) from Technische Universitaet Dresden, Germany in 2014. He currently holds a scientist position at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie. His main scientific interests are magnonic systems and their investigation using synchrotron based X-ray studies for imaging and their characterization.

Invited speakers include:

Manfred Albrecht (Universität Augsburg, Germany)
Hans Josef Hug (Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Switzerland)
Jagannath Jena (The Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Germany)
Ping Che (Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales, Université Paris-Saclay, France)
Jakub Jurczyk (Institute of Applied Physics, Technical University of Vienna, Austria)
Olivier Boulle (SPINTEC, France)
Angela Wittmann (Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany)
Max Birch (Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Germany)
Nikolai Kiselev (Peter Grünberg Institut and Institute for Advanced Simulation, Jülich, Germany)
Louise Desplat (Nanomat/Q-mat/CESAM, Université de Liège, Belgium)
Jan Masell (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)
Oleg Tretiakov (University of New South Wales, Australia)
Guido Meier (Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter, Germany)
Ales Hrabec (Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland)
Santa Pile (Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria)
Luke Turnbull (Max-Planck-Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Germany)
Tetsuya Nakamura (Tohoku University International Synchrotron Radiation Innovation and Smart Research Center, Japan)
Lisa-Marie Kern (Max-Born-Institut, Germany)
Saul Velez (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Spain)
Felix Büttner (University of Augsburg, Germany)

Abstract IDs: 

[1075],[1108],[1137],[1138],[1143],[1207],[1305],[1313],[1320],[1324],[1325],[1326],[1337],[1345],[217],[1372]

Superconducting Spintronics: Novel Quantum Circuits

The emerging field of spintronics is based on electron spin and magnetization. This new area of research and technology aims at enhancing the storage capacity of computer hard drives and potentially play an important role in quantum computing’s future. Superconductor-ferromagnet (SF) structures are widely regarded as the building blocks of this superconducting spintronic technology. It is generally accepted that conventional spintronic devices typically require large currents with high resistance giving rise to heat concerns, so researchers are investigating the viability of superconductors showing no/low resistance (dc/ac) to the current flow. In superconductors, there is no magnetic field in the interior of the superconductor, while there is a saturated magnetic field presence in the ferromagnetic material, when these two materials meet at a boundary interface, there could be an electromagnetic proximity effect. This session will consist of world-wide leading speakers with new results in a way to understand longstanding questions about how SF structures interact, and these could lead to a fast and effective technology of superconducting spintronics.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

Proximity effects in SF structures
Josephson pi-juncitons
Spin-triplet supercurrents
Memory devices

Session Organizer/Moderator
Alexander A. Golubov – Anatolie Sidorenko

 

Dr. Alexander Golubov is an Associated Professor at Twente University. Published more than 400 scientific papers in internationally recognized journals, received over 12000 citations, h-index 54. APS Fellow (2021). His scientific interests involve theory of electronic transport in superconducting structures, including superconducting spintronics and the physics of unconventional and multiband superconductivity .

 

 

 

Prof. Dr. Anatolie Sidorenko is specialized in the field of nanotechnologies and functional superconducting nanostructures. He is director of Institute of Electronic Engineering and Nanotechnologies Academy of Sciences of Moldova, author of over 400 scientific publications, 42 patents, the editor of 4 books published in “Springer”, the editor of two thematic series “Functional Nanostructures” of Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, associated editor of Moldavian Journal of the Physical Sciences, member of Moldavian Academy of Sciences, member of Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft (DPG).

Invited speakers include:

Valerii M. Vinokur (Terra Quantum AG, Switzerland)
Irina Bobkova (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia)
Grigorii Bobkov (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Russia)
Andrey Vasenko (HSE Tikhonov Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics, Russia)
Vadim Geshkenbein (ETH Zurich, Switzerland)
Tairzhan Karabassov (Higher School of Economics, Moscow)
Oleg Mukhanov (SEEQC, Inc., USA)
Norman O. Birge (Michigan State University, USA)
Jan Aarts (Leiden University/Huygens-Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Netherlands)
Yoshihiro Iwasa (University of Tokyo, Japan)

Abstract IDs: 

[1020],[1025],[1029],[1044],[1045],[1058],[1118],[1128],[1133],[1154],[1181],[1237],[1258],[1350]

Device Physics of Josephson Junctions and Their Fundamental Technologies

The Josephson effect is observed when two superconducting electrodes are weakly coupled and a Josephson junction is a natural converter of a d.c. voltage into a high-frequency current. From the prediction of the Josephson effect, tremendous progress has been made in the technology of superconducting electronics. In this session, there will be discussions on the Josephson effect from theoretical aspects up to applications. Many applications of superconductivity in electronics, sensors, and high-frequency devices are based on the Josephson effect.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices (SQUIDs)
  • Superconducting Photon and Particle Detectors
  • Digital Electronics
  • Microwave Applications
  • Superconducting Quantum Bits
  • Superconducting THz emitters
  • Topological superconductor-based Josephson junction
  • Proximity and tunneling phenomena in JJ
Yılmaz Simsek, Olcay Kızılaslan

Dr. Yılmaz Şimşek works in the area of Physics-based Materials Science including the design, synthesis, characterization, and understanding of new materials in a single crystal bulk/thin-film form to functionalize them for potential applications in innovative electronic devices.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Olcay Kizilaslan has worked on superconductor materials from different points of view, ranging from superconducting single crystal growth to the potential application of superconductivity. His main research area is on the intrinsic Josephson effect and superconducting THz emitters.

 

 

Invited speakers include:

Alexey Ustinov (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)
Selçuk Köse (University of Rochester, USA)
Wolfgang Belzig (Universität Konstanz, Germany)
Khalil Harrabi (King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia)
Thomas Ortlepp (CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik GmbH, Germany)
Edward Goldobin (Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany)
Timur Filippov (HYPRES, Inc., USA)
Steven M Anlage (University of Maryland, USA)
Yulia Krasnikova (Fermilab, SQMS, USA)

Abstract IDs: 

[1381],[1042],[1283],[1039],[202],[1115],[235],[237],[1038],[1099],[1105],[1179],[1188],[1240],[1272],[1315],[201],[223],[236]

Novel Functional Magnetic Materials- Basic Approach and Applications

The overall goal of this session is to provide the most up to date information about the recent developments in different families of magnetic materials and future applications paying attention to basic aspects and on magnetic properties suitable for applications.

 

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Functional Magnetic Materials and Applications
  • Advances in Nanomagnetism
  • Magnetic Meta-materials
  • Magnetic Recording, Sensors and Microwave Devices
  • Novel Functional Magnetic Materials: Basic Approach and Applications
  • Soft and Hard Magnetic Materials
  • Boron Based Permanent Magnets & Magnetic Materials for Applications
  • Magnet Science and Technology
  • Biomedical applications of magnetism and magnetic materials
  • Other Aspects of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials
Session Organizer/Moderator
Arcady Zhukov – Kateryna Levada

Prof. Dr. A.P. Zhukov graduated in 1980 from the Physics Chemistry Department of the Moscow Steel and Alloys Institute (presently the National University of Science and Technology). In 1988 he received a Ph.D. degree from the Institute of Solid State Physics (Chernogolovka) of the Russian Academy of Science, and in 2010 Doctor of Science (habilitation) in Moscow State Lomonosov University. Present employment Ikerbasque Research Professor at the Department of the Polymers and Advanced Materials of the University of Basque Country, Spain. Current fields of interest: amorphous and nanocrystalline ferromagnetic materials, magnetic micro-wires, giant magneto-impedance, giant magnetoresistance, and magnetoelastic sensors. He has published more than 600 referred papers in international journals (total number of citations of A. Zhukov’s papers, updated December 21, 2023: 11265, Citation H Index=58). A. Zhukov is included in the ‘Ranking of the World Scientists: World´s Top 2 % Scientists” by Stanford University, in the Rankings of 175 most relevant researchers in Material Science and of 224 most relevant researchers in Physics residents in Spain (DIH, https://grupodih.info), in the ranking of top Materials Science scientists ranking by www.Research.com, in the list of Most cited authors of J. Magn. Magn. Mater. (https://exaly.com/journal/12443/journal-of-magnetism-and-magnetic-materials/top-authors) and of Sensors and Actuators A: (https://exaly.com/journal/13143/sensors-and-actuators-a-physical/top-authors). A. Zhukov is an Associate Editor of IEEE Magnetic letters and International Journal on Smart Sensing and Intelligent Systems, member of several editorial boards (Crystals, Sensors by MDPI) guest Editor of J. Alloys Compounds (currently of the Special issue Honouring Prof. K.H.J Buschow), J. Magn. Magn. Mater, edited two books: “Novel Functional Magnetic Materials” and “High Performance Soft Magnetic Materials” in Springer, wrote two books: “Magnetic Properties and Applications of ferromagnetic microwires with amorphous and nanocrystalline structure” and “Magnetic sensors based on thin magnetically soft wires with tuneable magnetic properties and its applications”, more than 20 book chapters (including one published in the Handbook of Magnetic Materials ed. by Prof. K. Buschow).

Dr. Kateryna Levada is the head of the Laboratory of Biomedical Applications at the REC “Smart Materials and Biomedical Applications” in IKBFU, Kaliningrad, Russia. She obtained her PhD from RWTH Aachen, Germany. She was the principal investigator of the project “Magnetic nanoparticles as a method for diagnosing the intestinal barrier and communication between the intestine and the liver”, supported by the Russian Ministry of Education and DAAD (57391664). She is also a co-leader of the NANOLIVER project, which belongs to the “NanoLiver Consortium”, under contract Y2018 / NMT-4949 NanoLiver-CM. Her research areas include magnetic nanomaterials, cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, liver cancer, and its therapy.

Invited speakers include:

Volodymyr Chernenko (University of the Basque Country – UPV/EHU, Spain)
Larisa Panina (Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University IKBFU, Russia)
Rastislav Varga (RVmagnetics a.s., Kosice, Slovakia)
Tatiana Damatopoulou (Laboratory of Electronic Sensors, National TU of Athens, Athens, Greece)
Nikolai Sergeevich Perov (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia)
Oleg Lunov (Institute of Physics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic)
Maria Lomova (Saratov State University, Russia)
Olga Goryacheva (Saratov State University, Russia)
Vasily Buchelnikov (Chelyabinsk University, Russia)
Senentxu Lanceros Mendes (BCMaterials, Spain)
Andrei Rogalev (The European Synchrotron, France)

Abstract IDs: 

[1088],[1092],[1107],[1180],[1182],[1250],[1308],[1314],[1333]

Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys and Magnetocalorics

The Special Session will provide a forum for discussions of the latest results in the innovative field of the ferromagnetic shape memory alloys and other ferroic materials, exhibiting giant magneto-strain and magnetocaloric effects, respectively. The session will cover all the fundamental and applied aspects related to these materials and the physical phenomena they demonstrate.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Heusler Materials
  • Magnetic Shape Memory Alloys and Applications
  • Magnetocaloric Effect
  • Magnetostructural Transitions and Related Effects
  • Giant magnetostriction
Session Organizer/Moderator
Volodymyr Chernenko – Arkady Zhukov

Prof. Dr. Volodymyr Chernenko graduated and has got a Ph.D. from Moscow State University. 38 years of research experience in centers in Ukraine, Germany, Japan, Italy, United States, France, Switzerland, Australia, Spain, Hong Kong and Russia. He has a permanent position as Ikerbasque Research Professor at BCMaterials & University of Basque Country, Spain. Professional interest is in the physics of phase transitions in solids and magnetism. Focused on research and development of the multifunctional magnetic shape-memory materials. Author of 320 original papers in ISI scientific journals and 6 book chapters with more than 8500 citations and h-index equal to 46. He is the International Fellow Awardee of the Helmholtz Association (Germany) in 2014. He is world-wide known as one of the founders of the new research area “Ferromagnetic shape memory alloys” being the organizer and/or invited speaker of many International conferences and symposia on this subject.

Dr. Prof. A.P. Zhukov graduated in 1980 from the Physics Chemistry Department of the Moscow Steel and Alloys Institute (presently National University of Science and Technology). In 1988 he received a Ph.D. degree from the Institute of Solid State Physics (Chernogolovka) of the Russian Academy of Science, in 2010 Doctor of Science (habilitation) in Moscow State ‘Lomonosov’ University. Present employment Ikerbasque Research Professor at the Department of the Polymers and Advanced Materials of the University of Basque Country, Spain. Current fields of interest: amorphous and nanocrystalline ferromagnetic materials, magnetic micro-wires, giant magneto-impedance, giant magnetoresistance, magnetoelastic sensor. He has published more than 600 referred papers in the international journals (total number of citations of A. Zhukov’s papers, updated December 21, 2023: 11265, Citation H Index=58). A. Zhukov is included in the ‘Ranking of the World Scientists: World´s Top 2 % Scientists” by Stanford University, in the Rankings of 175 most relevant researchers in Material Science and of 224 most relevant researchers in Physics residents in Spain (DIH, https://grupodih.info), in the ranking of top Materials Science scientists ranking by www.Research.com, in the list of Most cited authors of J. Magn. Magn. Mater. (https://exaly.com/journal/12443/journal-of-magnetism-and-magnetic-materials/top-authors) and of Sensors and Actuators A: (https://exaly.com/journal/13143/sensors-and-actuators-a-physical/top-authors). A. Zhukov is an associate Editor of IEEE Magnetic letters and International Journal on Smart Sensing and Intelligent Systems, member of several editorial boards (Crystals, Sensors by MDPI) guest Editor of J. Alloys Compounds (currently of the Special issue Honouring Prof. K.H.J Buschow), J. Magn. Magn. Mater, edited two books: “Novel Functional Magnetic Materials” and “High Performance Soft Magnetic Materials” in Springer, wrote two books: “Magnetic properties and applications of ferromagnetic microwires with amorphous and nanocrystalline structure” and “Magnetic sensors based on thin magnetically soft wires with tuneable magnetic properties and its applications”, more than 20 book chapters (including one published in the Handbook of Magnetic Materials ed. by Prof. K. Buschow).

Invited speakers include:

Arkady Zhukov (Ikerbasque, Department of the Polymers and Advanced Materials of the University of Basque Country, Spain)
Markus Gruner (University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany)
Akio Kimura (Hiroshima University, Japan)
Daniel Salazar (BCMaterials, Spain)
Maciej Szczerba (Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Poland)
Lluís Mañosa (University of Barcelona, Spain)
Jaume Pons (Universitat de les Illes Balears , Spain)
José María Porro Azpiazu (BCMaterials: Basque center for materials, applications &nanostructures. Leioa, Spain)
Xiao Xu (Department of Materials Science, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan)
Mehmed Acet (Duisburg-Essen University, Germany)
Javier López García (Universidad de Oviedo, Spain)

Abstract IDs: 

[1367],[1091],[1127],[1192],[1210],[1238],[1248],[1266],[1278],[1284],[1293]

Advances in Current-Induced Magnetization Control

Current-induced control of magnetization in ferromagnetic heterostructures relying on spin-torques is a central topic in magnetism and spintronics. Our improved understanding of spin-charge interconversion phenomena during the past two decades has provided fertile grounds for fundamental studies and application prospects for information technologies. This session aims to bring together pioneering researchers in this broad field to create a stimulating atmosphere and discuss the advances and opportunities of current-induced magnetization control from physics, materials, and application perspectives.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Spin-orbit torques
  • Spin-transfer torques
  • Domain wall/skyrmion devices
  • Magnetic tunnel junctions
  • Spin-charge interconversion
  • Spin and orbital currents
Session Organizer/Moderator
Can Onur Avci

Can Onur Avci is a principal investigator at the Institute of Materials Science of Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC) since February 2021. He received his Ph.D. degree from ETH Zürich in 2015 with an ETH medal for the outstanding doctoral thesis. He has worked at MIT (2016-2018) and ETH Zürich (2018-2021) as a postdoc before joining ICMAB. He is the recipient of an ERC Starting Grant (with the project MAGNEPIC) and the 2021 IUPAP Young Scientist Prize in the field of Magnetism. His research covers a wide breadth of subjects in spintronics and magnetism with a focus on electrical control of magnetization, spin-orbit-driven transport phenomena in thin films, spin currents, chiral spin textures, and magnetic memory and logic devices.

Invited speakers include:

Andrea Grimaldi (University of Messina, Italy)
Hidekazu Kurebayashi (University College London, UK)
Kai Liu (Georgetown University, USA)
Kerem Çamsarı (University of California Santa Barbara, USA)
Matthias Althämmer (Walter Meissner Institute, Germany)
Murat Çubukçu (University College London, UK)
Özhan Özatay (Bogazici University, Turkey)
Reinoud Lavrijsen (Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands)
Thomas Moore (University of Leeds, UK)
Tianxiang Nan (Institute of Microelectronics, Tsinghua University, China)
Wanjun Jiang (Tsinghua University, China)
Weisheng Zhao (Beihang University, Fert Beijing Institute, China)
Paolo Perna (IMDEA Nanoscience, Spain)
Frederic Bonell (SPINTEC Grenoble, France)
Aurélien Manchon (Aix-Marseille University, France)
Jiahao Han (Tohoku University, Japan)
Sachin Krishnia (Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany)

Abstract IDs: 

[1247],[1249],[1268],[1132],[1172],[1174],[1177],[1187],[1246],[1252],[1257],[1292],[1295],[1336],[1347],[1342]

Superconductivity and Magnetism in Heavy Fermion Systems

Heavy Fermion systems offer some of the most exciting phenomena in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism, including the coexistence of magnetic order and superconductivity. They are also the family where unconventional superconductivity was discovered and to date the only systems in which a magnetic origin of the superconducting pairing mechanism has been clearly demonstrated. This session will explore some recent breakthroughs in the field.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Heavy Fermion Superconductors
  • Low Temperature Superconductors
  • Unconventinal Superconductors
  • Magnetic Superconductors and Triplet Superconductivity
  • The Coexistence of Superconductivity and Magnetism
  • Kondo Effect/Systems
  • Quantum Critically and Spin Liquids
  • Quantum Phase Transition
Session Organizer/Moderator
Daniel Braithwaite – Duygu Yazici

Prof. Daniel Braithwaite Works on the physics of strongly correlated electron systems, mainly rare earth or uranium based intermetallic compounds with the effects on the unconventional superconductivity and its interaction with magnetism. Also Works on the Extreme conditions of high pressure, low temperature, and sometimes magnetic field, to tune the microscopic parameters of the sample in order to explore the phase diagram and attain the new quantum phases we search for. Experimental studies require sensitive measuring techniques, if possible of various kinds, in order to gain as much information as possible. The measurements that are performed at high pressure include sensitive resistivity measurements, using low temperature transformers and lock-in detection techniques, but also specific heat and magnetic susceptibility (using an a.c. techniques). We also use more and more the powerful tool that is synchrotron radiation for high pressure studies and regularly perform experiments at the ESRF such as resonant absorption spectroscopy to determine valence change as a function of pressure, and even resonant magnetic x-ray scattering at high pressure.

 

Duygu Yazici is an Advisor to the President of the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Türkiye (TUBİTAK), since 2021. She is also EUREKA High Level Representative of Turkey and a Board Member of the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). She was a Scientific Officer at the ERC between 2019-2021. She has performed her postdoctoral research in the Physics Department at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) with Prof. M. Brian Maple, working on materials exhibiting strongly correlated electron phenomena after completing both her Masters’s and Ph.D. degrees in Condensed Matter Physics at Cukurova University. Her research addresses strongly correlated electron phenomena in a novel transition metal, rare earth, and actinide-based oxides and intermetallic compounds.

Invited speakers include:

Shinsaku Kambe (JAEA Tokai, Japan)
Konstantin Semeniuk (MPI Dresden, Germany)
Alexander Eaton (University of Cambridge, UK)
Riku Yamamoto (Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA)

Abstract IDs: 

[1106],[1117],[1152],[1171],[1186],[1216],[1243],[1244]

Superconducting Thin Films and Interface Superconductivity

The focus of this session is on advanced studies of novel superconducting films, hetero-structures, surfaces, and interfaces. We will discuss thin film preparation, physical properties, interface superconductivity, and underlying physical mechanism, as well as superconductor-metal-insulator transition and emerging concepts and potential devices.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Elaboration of superconducting thin films
  • Processing of gated hetero-structures
  • Proximity effect and related devices
  • Metal-insulator-transition
  • Film properties
  • Interface superconductivity
  • Novel devices
Session Organizer/Moderator
Davor Pavuna – Neven Barisic

The focus of this session is on advanced studies of novel superconducting films, hetero-structures, surfaces, and interfaces. We will discuss thin film preparation, physical properties, interface superconductivity, and underlying physical mechanism, as well as superconductor-metal-insulator transition and emerging concepts and potential devices. Following an M.Sc (Zagreb, Croatia) Ph.D. (Leeds, UK) and Post-Doc (Grenoble, France) on properties of disordered materials since 1986. Prof. Davor Pavuna is leading the High-Tc superconductivity group at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. His interests are mainly in novel superconducting materials, thin films and their properties, interface superconductivity and metal-insulator transition.

 

Neven Žitomir Barišić is an associate professor at the Faculty of Science and Mathematics (PMF) of the University of Zagreb and at the Technical University of Vienna (TU Wien), Austria. An exceptionally creative researcher, who gathered and honed his experiences in many recognized world laboratories, went through all the steps in his development to now be recognized as a renowned scientist: from the creation of a doctoral thesis, cooperation with distinguished scientists, the use of numerous experimental techniques necessary for the elucidation of a certain physical problem, to their presentation in publications and numerous lectures around the world.
The focus of his scientific activity today is the search and study of new electronic materials, which are of fundamental scientific importance, but also have great potential for application.

Invited speakers include:

 

Abstract IDs: 

[1049],[1164],[1190],[1223],[1234],[1259]

Frontiers in Magnetization Dynamics and Magnonics

This session will discuss recent advances in magnetization dynamics in thin films and nanostructure devices, magnonics and spin pumping, Spin currents and spin torque devices using a broad variety of experimental techniques.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Magnetization dynamics in antiferromagnets and ferrimagnets
  • Nonconventional computing using magnetization dynamics
  • High-frequency magnetoelastic dynamics and other spin-wave hybrids.
Session Organizer/Moderator
Farkhad Aliev, Ahmad Awad

Farkhad G. Aliev: received the M.S. and Ph.D degrees in physics from M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University in 1981 and 1984 respectively. From 1984 till 1996 he worked as a junior and then senior researcher at M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University. He also spent several years as a visiting professor with at Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (1991-1995) and as research scientist at Katholieke University Leuven (1995-1998). From 1999 he works at the Faculty of Science at UAM where he has created a research group MAGNETRANS specialized in microwave dynamic response and noise in magnetic and superconducting nanostructures. He has been director of 10 PhD thesis. He is a co-author of more than 150 scientific publications indexed in Web of Science and 4 patents. He has presented more than 50 invited talks at international conferences and co-organized four international Schools and Conferences. Actually, he serves as associated editor for Scientific Reports.

Ahmad A. Awad, Since March 2023, has been serving as an Associate Professor at Tohoku University’s Research Institute of Electrical Communication in Japan. He also holds a position of 1st Research Engineer at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, where he focused his research on magnetooptical high frequency dynamics, Spin Hall nanooscillators and stimulated spin dynamics. He did one-year postdoctoral research, 2013, in micromagnetics at Seoul National University after he earned his Ph.D. in Physics in 2012 from the Autonomous University of Madrid, Spain.

Invited speakers include:

Sebastian Wintz (Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany)
Matthias Küss (University of Augsburg, Germany)
Joerg Wunderlich (University of Regensburg, Germany)
Madjid Annane (Unité Mixte de Physique CNRS / Thales / Université Paris Sud, France)
Davi Rodrigues (Politecnico di Bari, Italy)
Andrei Slavin (Oakland University, USA)
Artem Litvinenko (Gothenburg University, Sweden)

Abstract IDs: 

[1185],[1078],[1096],[1124],[1151],[1194],[1265],[1267],[1334],[1340],[219]

 

Superconductivity in Bi-layer Nickelates

Nickelate superconductors have become a hot topic of research in recent years because of their similarity to high-temperature superconductors, especially cuprates. The underlying mechanism of superconductivity is still unclear and there have been intense debates. The relatively simple unit cell structure of nickelate superconductors and their superconducting mechanism could elucidate the long-standing mechanism of superconductivity in cuprates. The superconducting phase at high pressure has an orthorhombic structure. Recent density functional theory calculations suggest that the superconductivity arises coincidentally with the metallisation and the apical oxygens connecting the Ni-O bilayers. In this focus session, both experimental and theoretical results will be presented and discussed in terms of similarities and dissimilarities with the outstanding properties of cuprates.

*Image is Courtesy of Meng Wang from publication “Superconductivity near 80 Kelvin in single crystals of La3Ni2O7 under pressure”

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• TBA

Session Organizer/Moderator
Ilya Eremin

Ilya Eremin is a Professor at Ruhr-University Bochum.His research interests lie in the field of condensed matter, with a focus on the theoretical study of quantum many-body systems. He is particularly interested in the study of strongly correlated, low-dimensional electronic and magnetic systems, as well as unconventional and high-temperature superconductivity. The peculiarity of these systems is that the electron-electron correlations here are enhanced by the effect of reduced dimensionality and competition of spin, charge and orbital degrees of freedom. In addition, it must be taken into account that the ground state in these systems changes drastically as a function of only a single parameter.

Furthermore, He deals with systems that have geometric frustration in addition to low dimensionality and strong electronic correlations.

Invited speakers include:

Ilya Eremin (Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany)
Kazuhiro Kuroki (Osaka University, Japan)
Fu-Chun Zhang (University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)
Xingjiang Zhou (National Lab for Superconductivity, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)
Ariando Ariando (National University of Singapore, Singapore)
Mark Dean (BNL, USA)
Meng Wang (Center for Neutron Science and Technology, Sun Yat-Sen University, China)
Jonathan Pelliciari (Brookhaven National Laboratory USA)

Abstract IDs: 

[1063][1139][1379]

HTS Cuprates: Advances in Fundamentals and Experimental Studies

The interesting properties of cuprate based high-temperature superconductors (HTS) have been of high interest to the community of researchers working on superconductivity since their discovery in 1986. The session is to include the topics from the material properties aspects as well and the physical properties from characterization measurements. The session includes all characteristics of HTS Cuprates depending upon the recent advances, the prevailing arguments, and debates on the many families of superconductors. Since the high-temperature superconductivity was discovered in La2-xBaxCuO4 in 1986, many research works have aimed at understanding these interesting materials not only from the fundamental side but also from the application point of view.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • High-Tc Cuprates
  • HTS Superconducting Thin Films,Proximity Effects, and Interface Superconductivity
  • Nanoscale, Surface and Interface Superconductivity
  • Photoemission and ARPES
  • Study of Fermi Surface of HTS by Magnetic Quantum Oscillations
  • Superconducting Fluctuations and Related Effects
Session Organizer/Moderator
Ivan Bozovic – Davor Pavuna – Neven Barisic

Ivan Bozovic received his PhD in Solid State Physics from Belgrade University, Yugosla-via, where he was later elected a professor and the Physics Department Head. After moving to USA in 1985 he worked at Stanford University, the Varian Research Center in Palo Alto, California, and in Oxxel, Bremen, Germany. Since 2003, he is the MBE Group Leader at Brookhaven National Laboratory, and since 2014 also an Adjunct Professor at Yale University.

He is a Member of European Academy of Sciences, Foreign Member of the Serbian Academy of Science and Arts, Fellow of APS, and Fellow of SPIE. He received the Bernd Matthias Prize for Superconducting Materials, SPIE Technology Award, the M. Jaric Prize, the BNL Science and Technology Prize, was Max Planck and Van der Waals Lecturer, and was elected two times as a Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Principal Investigator.

Ivan’s research interests include basic physics of condensed states of matter, novel electronic phenomena including unconventional superconductivity, innovative methods of thin film synthesis and characterization, quantum materials, and nano-scale physics. He has published 11 research monographs and over 300 research papers, including 30 in Science and Nature journals.

The focus of this session is on advanced studies of novel superconducting films, hetero-structures, surfaces, and interfaces. We will discuss thin film preparation, physical properties, interface superconductivity, and underlying physical mechanism, as well as superconductor-metal-insulator transition and emerging concepts and potential devices. Following an M.Sc (Zagreb, Croatia) Ph.D. (Leeds, UK) and Post-Doc (Grenoble, France) on properties of disordered materials since 1986. Prof. Davor Pavuna is leading the High-Tc superconductivity group at Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland. His interests are mainly in novel superconducting materials, thin films and their properties, interface superconductivity and metal-insulator transition.

Neven Žitomir Barišić is an associate professor at the Faculty of Science and Mathematics (PMF) of the University of Zagreb and at the Technical University of Vienna (TU Wien), Austria. An exceptionally creative researcher, who gathered and honed his experiences in many recognized world laboratories, went through all the steps in his development to now be recognized as a renowned scientist: from the creation of a doctoral thesis, cooperation with distinguished scientists, the use of numerous experimental techniques necessary for the elucidation of a certain physical problem, to their presentation in publications and numerous lectures around the world.
The focus of his scientific activity today is the search and study of new electronic materials, which are of fundamental scientific importance, but also have great potential for application.

 

Invited speakers include:

Roberta Caruso (BNL, USA)
Kazuhiro Fujita (BNL, USA)
Assa Auerbach (Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Israel)
Annette Bussmann-Holder (Max Planck Stuttgart, Germany)
Carlo Di Castro (Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei, Italy)
Giacomo Ghiringhelli (Politecnico di Milano, Italy)
Wei Ku (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)
Srinivas Raghu (Stanford University, USA)
Wen Hu (Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA )
Jure Demsar (Institute of Physics Staudingerweg, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz, Germany)
Luis Balicas (The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, USA)
Neil Harrison (LANL, USA)
Denis Sunko (Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb,Croatia)
Sergei Mukhin (National University of Science and Technology MISIS, Russia)
Sergei Ovchinnikov (Kirensky Institute of Physics, Federal Research Center KSC SB RAS, Russia)

Abstract IDs: 

[1005],[1021],[1022],[1024],[1077],[1135],[1221],[1229],[1245],[1274],[1289],[1291],[1330],[1335]

 

Molecular Spin Qubits toward Quantum Computer

Classical bits are composed of 0 and 1, while quantum bits (Qbits) are composed of the superposition of 0 and 1. Qubits are very promising and available for quantum computer as well as quantum sensor. Quantum computer has tremendous advantages for calculation speeds compared with the supercomputer. So far, several qubits are realized by using superconducting loops, photons, quantum dots, trapped atoms, nitrogen vacancy in diamond, etc. More recently, molecular spin qubits are considered to be the next generation candidate of qubits, because of (1)Spin phase control by pulse ESR, (2)High spin-polarization of electron spin, and (3)High molecular designability. However, the demerit is the short lifetime of superposition (T2: spin-spin relaxation time). The boundary condition is 2T1>T2 (T1:spin-lattice relaxation time). Therefore, we must lengthen the T1 and T2 and, moreover realize the room temperature performance with long coherence of the molecular spin qubits for real application by the molecular designs, the crystal lattice designs, etc.
In this session, we will discuss about the recent progress and perspectives on the molecular spin qubits for quantum computer.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Molecular Spintronics
  • Single-Molecule Magnets
  • Spin Crossover Complexes
  • Molecule-Based Magnets
  • Molecular Spin Qubits
  • High-Density Memory Devices

 

Session Organizer/Moderator
Masahiro Yamashita

Masahiro Yamashita received PhD in 1982 from Kyushu University. After his graduation, he was appointed as Assistant Professor at Kyushu University in 1983. In 1989, he was appointed as Associate Professor at Nagoya University, and he was promoted to full Professor at the same university in 1998. He was a full Professor at Tokyo Metropolitan University from 2000 to 2004. Then he moved to Tohoku University as a full Professor. He is now an Emeritus Professor of Tohoku University. He has been honored with the Inoue Scientific Award (2002), the Chemical Society of Japan Award for Creative Work (2005), the Award of Japan Society of Coordination Chemistry (2014), the Mukai Award (2018), and the Chemical Society of Japan Award for 2019.

Invited speakers include:

Masahiro Yamashita (Tohoku University, Japan)
Wolfgang Wernsdorfer (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Germany)
Tadahiro Komeda (Tohoku University, Japan)
Stephen Hill (Florida State University, USA)
Toyo Kazu Yamada (Chiba University, Japan)
Yingshuang Fu (Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China)
Nicolas Lorente (Donostia International Physics Center, Spain)
Christoph Wolf (Center for Quantum Nano Science , South Korea)
Stefan Minasian (LBNL, USA)
Fernando Luis (University of Zaragoza, Spain)
Joe Zadrozny (Colorado State University, USA)
Alexey Popov (IFW Dresden, Germany)
Lapo Bogani (University of Oxford, UK)

Abstract IDs: 

[1006],[1035],[1055],[1067],[1070],[1212],[1290],[1358],[1378]

Large Scale Applications of Superconductors and  Their Fundamental Technologies

The benefits of superconductors include energy-saving and high field generation. This session will focus on applied superconductivity than the physics of superconductivity. The topics of the session include various applications of both high Tc superconductors and low Tc superconductors as well as their fundamental technologies.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Medical, Scientific and Energy Applications of Superconductors
• Fundamental technologies for large-scale applications of superconductors
• Stability, quench and protection of superconductor magnets
• Ac losses in superconductors
• Various electromagnetic, thermal and mechanical modellings

Session Organizer/Moderator
 Arno Godeke – Naoyuki Amemiya

 

Arno Godeke was educated in Mechanical Engineering, Physics Engineering, and Applied Physics in the Netherlands and the USA. He has broad multidisciplinary experience in mechanical, electrical, and cryogenic design, fabrication, and implementation; and in the materials science, large-scale application and physics of superconductors. He has worked in superconductivity in various positions at the University of Twente, The Netherlands, from 1992 through 2005. In 1998, he visited the NHMFL, Tallahassee, FL, USA, on a sabbatical, and worked at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USA, from 2002 to 2003 to obtain his PhD in Applied Physics from Twente in 2005. Since 2006, Dr. Godeke is at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA, where he is responsible for the conductor support for LBNL’s high-field magnets and LARP, the development of new high-field conductor and magnet technologies, and fundamental research through the education of young talent. He is currently a consultant with the independent firm Senior Consulting for Superconductivity.

Prof. Amemiya received his Dr. Eng. Degre from the University of Tokyo in 1990. He joined Yokohama National University in the same year (Lecturer in 1992; Associate Professor in 1993; Professor in 2005) and transferred to Kyoto University in 2008. He stayed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory 1996 and at the University of Twente From 2000 to 2001.

 

Invited speakers include:

Alex Otto (Solid Material Solutions, USA)
Michael Eisterer (TU Wien, Atominstitut, Austria)
Hans van Oort (University of Twente, Enschede, Netherlands)
Charlie Sanabria (Commonwealth Fusion Systems, USA)
Sastry Pamidi (FAMU-FSU and the Center for Advanced Power Systems, USA)
Vitaly Vysotsky (Russian Scientific R&D Cable Institute, Russia)
Stéphane Lucas (IBA, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium)
Ernesto Bosque (National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Tallahassee, FL, USA)
Sandro Rossi (HITRIplus, Italy)

Abstract IDs: 

[1382],[1028],[1031],[1034],[1051],[1052],[1053],[1087],[1113],[1145],[1178],[1215],[1304],[1311]

Novel Quantum Magnetism in Low Dimensions

Research in quantum phenomena in magnets with competing interactions and in low dimensions remains at the forefront of condensed matter physics, inspiring a multitude of quests for exotic states, models that can realize them, and real materials that can host them. Competing magnetic interactions due to lattice geometry or spin-orbit coupling give rise to elusive spin-liquid states with fractional excitations, valence-bond phases with spatial symmetry breaking, quantum spin nematics, and unconventionally ordered phases and phase transitions. A new platform to create and study novel magnetic phenomena is provided by magnetic van der Waals materials that can be thinned down to a monolayer limit. The abundance of various types of magnetic orders and their high tunability also make these materials important for future applications.

 

In this session, recent theoretical and experimental advances in this exciting field of research will be presented and discussed by distinguished international experts.

 

 

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Frustrated Magnetism and Spin Systems
  • Quantum Spin Liquids
  • Low Dimensional Magnetism
  • Novel Developments in Orbital Physics
  • Quantum Spin Nematics
  • Magnetic van der Waals materials
  • Magnetism in Quantum Materials

 

Session Organizer/Moderator
Alexander Chernyshev, Mike Zhitomirsky

Alexander (Sasha) Chernyshev is a Professor at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California,  Irvine. His research interests are in the theory of strongly correlated electronic systems and quantum magnetism, with a recent focus on the unconventional quantum phases in quantum magnets with anisotropic-exchange interactions.

 

 

Mike Zhitomirsky is a condensed matter theorist at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research, CEA, and the Institute of Laue-Langevin, Grenoble,  France. His research interests are in the theory of frustrated and quantum magnets, phase transitions, Monte Carlo simulations, strongly correlated electronic systems, and unconventional superconductivity.

 

 

Invited speakers include:

Alexander Chernyshev (University of California, Irvine, USA)
Michael Zhitomirsky (IRIG, CEA-Grenoble, France)
Pavel Maksimov (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia)
Milan Orlita (High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Grenoble, France)
Sergey Sosin (Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems, Russia)
Sergey Streltsov (Institute of Metal Physics, Russia)
Alexander Nikolaevich Vasiliev (Moscow State University, Russia)
Andrew Wildes (ILL, Grenoble, France)
Frederic Mila (Ecole Polytechnique de Lausanne, Switzerland)
Hao Zeng (University at Buffalo, USA)
Vladislav Kataev (Leibniz Institute of Solid State and Materials Research IFW Dresden, Germany)

Abstract IDs: 

[1007],[1010],[1018],[1019],[1057],[1061],[1071],[1081],[1097],[1098],[1144],[1213],[1219],[1251],[1302],[204],[205],[207],[234]

Quantum Information Technology and Applications

Quantum supremacy has been demonstrated by a quantum computer based on superconductive qubits. This session focuses on the vision of the future quantum internet compatible with the novel quantum computers. We will be talking about fundamental physics phenomena and the prospect of their implementation in the future real life devices, systems and related infrastructure.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Quantum communication
  • Quantum photonics
  • Quantum computation
  • Quantum optics of atoms, molecules and solids
  • Quantum imaging
  • Quantum cryptography
Session Organizer/Moderator
Joanna Skiba-Szymanska

Joanna Skiba-Szymanska received her MSc in electronics engineering from the Wroclaw University of Technology (Poland) followed by PhD in semiconductor physics from Sheffield University (UK) in 2008. Since then she has been working at Toshiba Europe Limited in Cambridge and collaborating amongst others with Cambridge University (UK). She is an expert in single and entangled photon light emitters for quantum communication applications.

Invited speakers include:

Rose Scowen (Toshiba Research Europe, UK)

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Twistronics in 2D layers

2D atomically thin layers based on van der Waals (vdW) Engineering are providing various physics and applications. Recently, those with magic angles are also attracting considerable attention as twintronics. Among those, 2D topological materials are the hottest topic. 2D topological insulators provide a quantum Hall spin phase with helical edges spin states, which enable topologically protected zero-emission energy devices. 2D topological superconductors and magnetic materials also deliver rich quantum phenomena such as Majorana fermion for topological quantum computation. Various atomically thin layers with different mechanisms have reported such topological phases.  In this session, the world-top-level researchers get together and discuss those essential physics and feasibility.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Topological insulators
  • Topological superconductors
  • Topological magnetic materials
  • Fabrications, theories, physics, and applications
  • Magic angle layers and twintronics
  • Flat bad phenomena
  • vdW spintronics with spin-orbit interaction and torque
  • Majorana-fermion-based phenomena and applications
  • Topological quantum computation
  • High-temperature operation
Session Organizer/Moderator
Junji Haruyama

Junji Haruyama is a Principal Professor of Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo, Japan, and a Research Fellow at The University of Tokyo, Institute for Industrial Science. He graduated from Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, in 1985. Then, he joined Quantum device laboratory, NEC Corporation, Japan and worked until 1994. He received PhD in physics from Waseda University in 1996 by so many famous obtaining at NEC. During 1995–1997, he worked with the University of Toronto, Canada, and also Ontario Laser and Lightwave Research Center (Canada) as a visiting scientist. He has worked at the present Aoyama Gakuin University since 1997 and at the University of Tokyo since 2019 until now. He was also a visiting professor at NTT Basic Research Laboratories in 2003, at Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo in 2008 and 2017, and at Zero-emission Energy Center grant, Kyoto University in 2011-13, Japan. He has peer review publications over 200 and 4 patents, and also invited talks over 200. He has been also a (co)author of books over 30, a referee of Journals over 50, and a member of international committees (organizer, adviser, chairman) over 30 conferences.
His main interests are low-dimensional topological-insulating states, spintronics, magnetism, nano-photonics, and superconductivity in 2D atomically thin materials, semiconductors, and carbon nanotubes.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Superconducting Motors and Applications in Electrical Engineering

This session is intended to bring together the world’s renowned specialists in the field of high-temperature superconducting motors. Contributions may include simulations and machine designs, but the main purpose of this session is to show already built full-scale superconducting machines, prototypes with original structures, or other machines under construction.

The presentations may also focus on technologies related to the development of superconducting machines, such as pulsed-field magnetization techniques, superconducting wires and tapes, torque tubes, slip rings, cryogenics, and rotating joints.

Any related applications for use in combination with superconducting motors are also welcome in this session such as flux pumps, HTS cables, cryogenic power electronics, HTS dynamos, superconducting bearings, and gears.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Motors and Generators
  • Power Applications of Superconductors
  • Power Cables
  • Techniques and Instrumentation of Large Scale and Energy Applications
  • Numerical Modelling of Superconducting Materials and Applications
  • Cryogenic Engineering Modeling
  • Instrumentation
Session Organizer/Moderator
Kévin Berger

Kévin Berger is an Associate Professor at the University of Lorraine, Group of Research in Electrical Engineering of Nancy (GREEN), in France since 2010.  In 2006, K. Berger obtained his Ph.D. on the modeling of coupled magneto-thermal problems in High-Temperature Superconductors (HTS). Then, he worked for two years at G2ELab and Neel Institute in Grenoble with Prof. Pascal Tixador on the design and realization of an 800 kJ HTS SMES, the first conduction-cooled SMES realized in Europe. After having spent one year in the industry (Exxelia Group) designing magnetic components for aircraft and space applications, he joined the GREEN laboratory, which is involved in the design and study of superconducting applications, in particular superconducting motors. His main research topic concerns the magnetization of HTS bulks by Pulsed Field Magnetization for practical applications such as electrical motors and NMR systems. K. Berger is also interested in the potential in terms of trapped magnetic flux of new bulk materials such as YBCO foams, MgB2, and iron-based superconductors. He is still involved in the development of analytical and numerical tools and is the organizing Committee Chair of the 7th edition of the International Workshop on Numerical Modelling of High-Temperature Superconductors, will be held in Nancy, France, from May 26th to 29th, 2020. http://hts2020.eu/ Berger is currently engaged in two H2020 projects: IMOTHEP related to the “Future propulsion and integration: towards a hybrid/electric aircraft” and SMAGRINET regarding “Smart grid competence hub for boosting research, innovation and educational capacities for energy transition” https://www.smagrinet.eu/. For many years, he is an expert in the TC 90 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) which prepares International Standards (IS) related to superconducting materials and devices.

Invited speakers include:

Taketsune Nakamura (Kyoto University, Japan)
Hocine Menana (University of Lorraine, Research Group in Electrical Engineering of Nancy (GREEN) France)
Jingyu Huang (Tongji University, China)
Masayoshi Ohya (Kwansei Gakuin University, Japan)
Nikolay Ivanov (Moscow Aviation Institute ,National Research University, Russia)

Abstract IDs: 

[1129],[1196],[1276],[1281],[1374]

Recent Progresses in Renewable Energy Technology and Its Implication: Materials Perspectives

Energy plays a pivotal role in our daily lives, its demand is on the rise more than ever and it is essential for the economic development of any country. Electric energy is of particularly vital importance for sustainable development. Forecast of energy demand is highly important and careful planning plays an essential role to meet the needs of the society in the future. Renewable, as well as other vital sources of energy, enable the existence of diversity. The use of these various sources in one grid creates some unexpected problems which, combined with global warming, could cause Earth to heat up by a few degrees in the near future. This is a particular concern, should non-renewable energy resources continue to be used within the next 30-40 years. Recent progress in the introduction of renewable energy and various associated technologies will be discussed in this session in addition to photovoltaic, solar thermal, wind, thermoelectricity and other technologies, particular attention will be paid to applications of superconductors and magnetic materials in the energy sector.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Techniques and Instrumentation of Large Scale and Energy Applications
  • Recent Progresses in Renewable Energy Technology and implications: Materials Perspectives
Session Organizer/Moderator
German F. De la Fuente, Ali Gungor

German F.de la Fuente is a Research Professor at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) working at the Aragon Institute for Materials Science (ICMA). He started the Laser Applications Laboratory at ICMA about 25 years ago, a reference in Laser Ablation and Melting. He is a co-inventor of 10 patents, co-author of 140+ scientific papers and has coordinated a large number of projects based on the use of laser technology developed in his research group.

 

 

 

Ali Güngör obtained his M.Sc in Physics at Maryland University (USA) in 1976, Ph.D. in Physics at Maryland University (USA) in 1982. He worked at Uludağ University (Turkey), Fatih University (Turkey). Now Prof. Ali Güngör is The Vice-Chancellor of The Bahcesehir University.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Ferrites and Rare Earth Magnetic Materials

Ferrites are an important class of magnetic materials containing ferric ions. These possess unique physicochemical properties including excellent magnetic characteristics, high chemical stability, tunable shape and size, and the ease with which they can be modified or functionalized. This session will address the reviews in the field of ferrite and rare earth magnetic materials.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

Primary:

  • Ferrites and Rare Earth Magnetic Materials

Secondary:

  • Magnetic Materials Processing and Physical Properties
  • Multiferroics and Magnetic Oxides
Session Organizer/Moderator
Muhammad Anis-ur-Rehman

Dr. Muhammad Anis-ur-Rehman in an experimentalist in Condensed Matter Physics. Facile synthesis methods are utilized for the development of micro and nanostructures. Main themes are energy generation and salvage. High frequency and data storage applications, Thermoelectricity, Sensing applications, Fuel cells, and Solar cell applications are the name of a few projects under investigation.
He has more than two hundred publications, which include publications in impact factor journals, book chapters, and conferences proceedings. He has supervised a number of undergraduate and graduate research theses. He is a recipient of the DRSM Gold medal from Pakistan Academy of Sciences, Pakistan and Young Scientist Award from CSJ, Japan. He has excellent ranking among the scientists in the field and has been awarded Research Productivity Award multiple times by his Institute as well as by Pakistan Council for Science and Technology, Pakistan.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1089],[1090],[1093],[1094],[1109],[1120],[1168],[1183],[1217],[1227],[1228],[1230],[218],[222]

Advances in Thin Films, Multi-Layers and Patterned Nanostructures

Magnetic structures such as thin films, multilayers, nano size particles are quite attractive systems in technological fields, as their magnetic and transport properties can be manipulated by applying any external factor. Hence, they have been under intense investigation because of their useful applications in device technologies. In particular, the possibility of tuning the magnetic properties of the ultra-thin films with voltage has opened new avenues in a wide variety of technological fields, ranging from information technologies to healthcare devices. In addition, spin transport processes in nanoscale structures are very important as a promising application to reduce power consumption and realize high-density memory in various device configurations. The research regarding of this kind of magnetic structures has become an exciting field especially for spin-dependent applications such as spintronic sensors, memory devices and magneto-resistive biosensing platforms.

The aim of this session is to bring to gather the recent findings from the current research activities and new ideas to be presented to the participants from researchers all around the world during the conference. Hopefully, this will open up good opportunities to spark new ideas in minds for future research efforts.

Sessions Topics Include (but are not limited to) :
  • Voltage control of magnetism
  • Thin Films, Nanoparticles, and Micro/Nanostructures
  • Functional Oxide Thin Films
  • Nanomechanical characterization of materials
  • The magnetism of Nanoparticles, Nanowires, and Nanostructures
  • Magnetoelectric and Multiferroic materials
  • Spin Transport in Nanoscale Structures
  • Spin current-induced magnetization dynamics
Session Organizer/Moderator
Mustafa Ozturk, Erdem Demirci

Dr. Mustafa Öztürk received the B.S. degree from the Bogazici University, Turkey, in 2003, and the Ph.D. degree from Gebze Technical University, in 2016. Now he is a researcher and experimental physicist at the Gebze Technical University. His current research interests include magnetoelectronics, magnetoresistive devices, electrical field control of magnetism, spin orbit torques in nanostructured magnetic multilayers, microlithography and microcontact printing.

 

 

 

Dr. Erdem Demirci is an instructor in Applied Physics, and he is physicist from Gebze Technical University. He received his PhD Degree in Physics from Gebze Technical University (Turkey) in 2016. Between 2016-2017, he worked as a postdoc on graphene production and spin filter for 2 years at Istanbul Medeniyet University. In 2020, he spent 1 year on voltage control of magnetism at Universitat de Barcelona. Currently, he is working on voltage control of magnetism in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric hybrid materials for energy-efficient spintronic devices at Gebze Technical University. He has experience in magnetron sputtering deposition, micro/nano fabrication techniques for magnetic sensors, optical lithography, single layer graphene production, magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE), and magneto-transport properties.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs : 

[1032],[1040],[1287],[1270]

Spintronics Materials-Devices and Applications

The utilization of a purely quantum mechanical property of the electron, namely spin, together with or instead of electron charge opens up many possibilities in device applications. The rich spectrum of spintronic applications includes magnetic random access memory, spin logic gates, spin torque nano-oscillators, radio frequency gene- rators and detectors, domain wall logic, skyrmionic devices, antiferromagnetic spintronic devices etc. This session will focus on the newly discovered physical phenomena in magnetic thin films and nanomagnets that will be the driving force for emerging device applications.

 

 

 

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Spintronic Devices utilizing perpendicular anisotropy magnetic films
• Spin Torque/ Spin Orbit Torque Devices
• Micromagnetic Studies of Spintronic Devices
• Spintronic Devices- Memory and Sensor Applications
• Spin logic devices

Session Organizer/Moderator
Mürsel Alper

Mürsel ALPER received his Ph.D. degree in solid state physics from the Department of Physics in University of Bristol (U.K.) in 1995. He firstly observed the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect of electrodeposited magnetic superlattices during Ph.D. studies in 1993. He currently works as a professor at the Department of Physics, Bursa Uludag University. In recent years, his interests have ranged from metal oxide and diluted magnetic semiconductors to ferromagnetic nanostructures and spintronic materials. He is active in the fields of the fabrication of nanostructured materials by electrodeposition and sputtering techniques, magnetic and magnetoresistance behaviors of the ferromagnetic multilayers, thin films, nanowires, spintronic materials and devices. He is a highly cited author in the electrodeposited nanomaterials field for the period 1993- present. He has authored or coauthored over 100 peer-reviewed papers.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1136],[1218],[1231]

Graphene and 2D Materials – Theory Session

The discovery of graphene generated a remarkable research effort in understanding and exploiting these materials. The extraordinary physical properties of graphene have also triggered interest in other 2D materials such as transition metal dichalcogenides, black phosphorus, and hexagonal boron nitride.
These materials offer new possibilities which include improved control of the electronic and optical properties, manipulation of spin degrees of freedom and confinement of excitons.
They have topological properties that are important in electronic applications such as field-effect transistors, photovoltaic devices, and bio-sensor.
In this session, the theoretical aspects of graphene and other new families of 2D materials will be discussed.
Current knowledge on the physical properties of graphene and related 2D crystals will be expanded by various computational approaches and the modeling of the electronic structure.
In particular important issues such as the dependence of the energy gap on thickness and strain, the multi-orbital character of the electronic state and the effect of the strong spin-orbit coupling will be investigated through various theoretical approaches.
This session will contribute to a better understanding of the intense activity taking place in these atomically thin 2D crystalline solids.
It is also hoped that some new possibilities with these materials will be put forward.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Graphene : Fundamentals and Mechanisms

Session Organizer/Moderator
Oguz Gulseren

Prof. Oğuz Gülseren obtained his Ph.D. in condensed Matter Physics at Bilkent University, 1992.
His research areas are theoretical solid-state physics, nanoscience, metal nanowires, carbon nanotubes, phonons and vibrational spectrum, electronic structure of solids, materials properties from the first principle.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1200],[1327],[213]

Nanocomposites: Properties and Applications

Crucial enhancements in functional and physical properties are achieved by implementing composite materials on the nanoscale. These improvements have driven the industrial research strategy to more advanced high-end applications. These applications include permanent magnets, biosensors, catalysis, storage media, supercapacitors, solar cells, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic refrigeration, and microwave devices. This session presents an overview of existing and new pathways for the development of the next generation of application-targeted nanocomposites.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Nano-magnetic materials
• Oxide-ferrite nanocomposites
• Hard-soft nanocomposites
• Magnetic Exchange effect
• Dielectric materials
• Permanent magnets
• Photocatalysts
• Water treatment
• Antibacterial

Session Organizer/Moderator
Ramadan Awad

Professor Ramadan Awad completed his Ph.D. as a channel system between Alexandria University (Egypt) and Genoa University (Italy) in 1997. He worked in the field of high-temperature superconductivity Mercury – Thallium Cuprates. He was awarded the professor degree in 2007. Prof. Awad worked as a director of the computer center at the Faculty of Science (Alexandria University) from 2011 to 2012. Currently, he is the Chairman of the Physics Department and the Dean of the Faculty of Science at Beirut Arab University (Lebanon).

His research interests are:
• Electrical and Magnetic Properties of Solids
• Superconductivity
• Nano-materials preparation
• Mechanical Properties of Solids
• Magnetic Properties of Nano-ferrite
• Composite materials
• Permanent magnets
• Photocatalysts
• Water treatment

He has more than 200 publications in the field of superconductivity and Nano Science.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1014]

Applications of Quantum-Flux-Parametron Circuits

In the last decade, the classical superconductor electronics is moving towards quantum electronics. Deterministic classical circuits based on superconductors. The field is very active and begins to mature. In this session, we aim to bring together a group of prominent leading researchers with students, postdoctoral researchers and other participants to discuss the latest experimental and theoretical developments in superconductor electronics based on Josephson junctions. The technical focus of the session is the adiabatic quantum flux parametron, the related theory, the circuit implementations, applications and the interface to quantum electronics.

 DiaQuantFab Laser

 

 

 

MGravi

 

 

 

Diamant eLiSe

 

 

 

Nano-Kryotrons

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Josephson junction electronics
• Adiabatic quantum flux parametron
• Switching energy and delay
• AQFP circuit implementations
• Combinations of superconducting Qubits and AQFP circuits

Session Organizer/Moderator
Thomas Ortlepp

Prof. Dr. Thomas Ortlepp studied mathematics at the Technical University of Ilmenau and received his PhD in quantum electronics in 2004. After that, Thomas Ortlepp did research in the field of low-temperature physics at the University of Twente in Holland. In 2010, Thomas Ortlepp habilitated in the field of microelectronics and subsequently took over the leadership of an industrial project for high-performance quantum memory circuits at the University of California in Berkeley.

In 2013, Thomas Ortlepp returned to Germany and started his career at CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik GmbH. In 2015, he was appointed Distinguished Professor by Yokohama National University.

Also in 2015, Thomas Ortlepp took over the management of the CiS Research Institute (CiS Forschungsinstitut für Mikrosensorik GmbH) until today. He is co-founder and vice president of the MEMS Smart Sensor Institute in Nanjing, China, which was established in 2018.

His research focuses on the development of silicon microsystems (MEMS and MOEMS) and the industrial application of quantum technology.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Unconventional Superconductivity, and Tunable Quantum States

Despite intensive investigations, unconventional superconductors, still hold in store many surprises. Unconventional superconductivity refers to unusual pairing mechanism, Cooper pairs are not bound together by phonon-exchange (BCS) but instead by some other exchange mechanism, e. g. spin fluctuations in a superconductor with magnetic order either coexistent or nearby in the phase diagram with the hidden dome of Quantum Critical Point (QCP). This session covers the fundamental properties of various unconventional superconducting classes of materials – from 4f-electron heavy fermions to organic superconductors. In addition, a new emerging classes of superconductors (topological, interfacial) will be covered. This session will consist of the new advances, and the way ahead towards a better understanding of the unconventional superconductivity and pairing mechanism.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Unconventional Superconductors
• Quantum Fluctuations and Tunable Quantum States
• Frusrated Magnetism and Spin Systems
• Quantum Criticality and Spin Liquids

Session Organizer/Moderator
Toni Shiroka

As a senior scientist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich) and PSI, T. Shiroka makes regular use of local techniques such as µSR and NMR to investigate the properties of strongly correlated electron systems. Among his current research interests are organic, iron-based, and other unconventional superconductors, frustrated and low-dimensional magnetism, quantum spin liquids, etc.

Invited speakers include:

Yi Zhou (Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, China)
Toni Shiroka (Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik ETH, Switzerland)
Shingo Yonezawa (Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineerin, Kyoto University, Japan)

Abstract IDs: 

[1009],[1066],[1100],[1263]

Magnet Science and Technology  

The session is devoted to the high- field magnet systems for scientific exploration in the high energy physics, plasma physics, biosciences, chemistry, materials science, condensed matter physics, and mass spectrometry.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Large scale superconducting applications for the high energy physics
• HTS Magnets for the Commercialization
• Design and Construction of the First Industrial Scale Quadrupole Magnet in Turkey

Session Organizer/Moderator
Vyachelav Klyukhin

Dr. Vyachelav Klyukhin in present time works in two large-scale projects for the application of the superconducting technologies: magnetic system for the Compact Muon Solenoid ( CSM) constructed at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and the magnet for the detector in the Future Hadron Circular Collider (FCC-hh) considering to be constructed at CERN. Dr. Vyachelav Klyukhin has more than 20 years’ experience of using the FEM program TOSCA of Vector Field for modeling of the various magnetic system. He also provided the CMS detector with the magnetic field measuring and monitoring system based on the NMR-probes, Hall Probes, and flux-loops installed on the selected blocks of the steel magnetic flux return yoke of the CMS magnet.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Cryogenics Materials, Engineering and Applications

This session covers all cryogenics to establish the cryogenic system used to nuclear fusion, high energy physics, space science, medical science, maglev car, HTS application and etc. The discussion will be done in the field of low-temperature refrigeration, cryo-electronics, large cryogenic system, materials, thermodynamics and fluid dynamics for the above mentioned cryogenic applications.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Advances in Cryogenic Materials and Cryogenic Engineer
  • Cryogenic Engineer Modeling
  • Cryogenic Power Cables and Leads
  • Cryogenic- Cryocoolers
  • Cryogenic- Electronics
  • Cryogenic-Large Facility and Testing
  • Cryogenic-Refrigeration and Liquefaction
  • Hydrogen Cryomagnetics
  • Innovative Cooling Systems
  • Instrumentation
  • Materials testing and Evaluation
Session Organizer/Moderator
Yasuharu Kamioka

President Cold Tech LLC
Adjunct Researcher; Waseda University
Fellow Cryogenic and Superconductivity Society of Japan
President; Japan Industrial Society of Cryogenics and Superconductivity
Ph.D. from the University of Tokyo in 1984
Joined with Toyo Sanso Co. Ltd. In 1972 R&D in cryogenic engineering
Was a visiting researcher at UCLA
Was a visiting professor o Research Center for Materials Science at Extreme Conditions, Osaka University and a lecturer of Sophia University
Was a general manager of Cryogenics Department, a corporate officer of Tokyo Nippon Sanso Corporation
He has about 40 patents and more than 70 papers in cryogenics.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1037],[1275],[210]

 

Quantum spin and magnetism in chiral materials: CISS effect, solitons and skyrmions

Chiral magnets are currently the subject of intense investigations both because of their practical applications in technology and their interesing properties from the point of view of fundamental science. The applications exploit the charge and spin transport properties of a chiral magnet, which are strongly affected by the magnetic structure and thus can be controlled by the application of suitable magnetic fields. In addition, due to its topological nature, the magnetic structure of a chiralmagnet is protected against continuous deformations to homogeneous magnetic states, as ferromagnetic states. The chiral state can only turn into a homogeneous state through phase transitions that take place at definite points of the phase diagram. This robustness makes chiral magnets excellent candidates as the main components of spintronic devices and, for instance, they are specially suitable as the main components of information storage devices. Besides the applications, chiral magnets are very interesting objects from a fundamental point of view, as chiral symmetry and its breaking and restoration are ubiquitous phenomena appearing virtually in any domain of science, from elementary particle physics to astrophysics, and including chemistry, biology, and geology

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Magnetic Skyrmions and Chiral Magnetism
  • Chiral Induced Spin Selectivity (CISS) effect
  • Magnetic Vortex Dynamics
  • Quantum Phase Transitions
  • Theory of Magnetism
  • Topological Insulators and Superconductors
  • Topological Quantum Matter
  • Magnetic Phase Transitions
  • Spintronics – Devices and Applications
  • Functional Magnetic Materials and Applications
  • Magnetic Vortex measurements
Session Organizer/Moderator
Javier Campo & Jun Kishine

Prof. Javier CAMPO, made his doctoral thesis at the Aragón Materials Science Institute (ICMA), join research institute between the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the University of Zaragoza, in 1995. Later he moved to the University of Montpellier where he made a post-doctoral stay of 2 years. From 1998 to 2002 Dr J Campo was appointed by the CSIC as scientist responsible for the CRG-D1B at the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble (France). In 2003 he joined the ICMA as a researcher under the prestigious Spanish talent program “Ramón y Cajal” where he continued heading the Spanish CRGs at the ILL, including the CRG-D15 and the new XtremeD. He was Director of the ICMA from 2012 to 2020.
His scientific interest is focused on the study of “Magnetic Chirality” and “Purely organic magnets” by using neutron scattering techniques and recently he started to work on “in operando studies of materials for energy applications” by using also neutron scattering. He has held several international membership, among others; vice-presidency of the European Neutron Scattering Association (ENSA), Spanish delegate at the ILL Steering Committee, Chair of the VI European Conference on Neutron Scattering, and Chair of the Spanish Committee for Large Scale Research Facilities.

 

Prof. Jun KISHINE Jun-ichiro Kishine received his B.Sc. (1991) from Tokyo University of Science, and M.Sc. (1993), and PhD.in physics (1996) from the University of Tokyo. He was an assistant professsor (1996–2003) in Institute for Molecular Science. He was a visiting scientist in Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2000–2001). Then, he moved to Kyushu Institute of Technology as an associate professor (2003–2012). Since 2012, he has been a professor in the Open University of Japan. He is also a visiting professor of Institute for Molecular Science (2019–2022). Kyoto University (2020–2022) and the University of Tokyo (2021–). His current research interest is chiral symmetry breaking in materials and its physical outcome.

Invited speakers include:

Victor Ukleev (Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Germany)
Shizeng Lin (Los Alamos National Laboratory, United States)
Sergey V. Grigoriev (PNPI, Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia)
Yusuke Kato (University of Tokyo, Japan)
Shigeo Ohara (Nagoya Institute of Technology, NITECH, Japan)
Alexander Ovchinikov (Ural Federal University, Russia)
Oleg Utesov (Institute for Basic Science, South Korea)
Mustafa Eginligil (Institute of Advanced Materials,Nanjing Tech University, China)
Jun Kishine (Open University of Japan, Japan)

Abstract IDs: 

[1013],[1015],[1016],[1095],[214]

Topological Quantum Matter

Discovery of topological phase transitions and topological phases by Berezinskii, Kosterlitz, Thouless and Haldane brought topological revolution in quantum matter and introduced new concepts and phenomena ranging from gauge theories highlighting the Aharonov-Bohm effect and quark confinement to quantum Hall effect, topological band basis of topological insulators and topological features of superconductivity, superinsulation, and superconductor-insulator transition. This session aims at presenting new developments, advances, and unresolved issues in the field of topological quantum matter. Bringing together leading scientists working in the diverse areas of topological quantum matter will enable us to outline the further role of topology in physics and the developments in realizing and exploring new topological phases of matter.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Topological insulators and superconductors
  • Quantum effects due to the topology of physical space
  • Topological quantum phase transitions
  • Topological nature of the charge confinement
  • Topological phases in Josephson junction arrays
  • Topological features of the spontaneous Hall effect
  • Topological properties of bilayer graphene
  • Effective space curvature and gauge fields
Session Organizer/Moderator
Valerii Vinokur

Valerii Vinokur is a Chief Technology Officer at Terra Quantum AG and an Adjunct Professor at City University of New York, USA. He received his PhD in 1979 at the Institute of the Solid State Physics, RAS, Chernogolovka, Russia. Valerii’s research interests include quantum topological matter, topological phase transitions, quantum information, vortex physics, superconductivity, quantum phase transitions, quantum transport, disordered materials, out of equilibrium phenomena, ultraquantum thermodynamics, and mesoscopic physics. He is a Foreign Member of Norwegian National Academy of Science and Letters and a Fellow of the American Physical Society. He is a Laureate of the Fritz London Memorial Prize, International Abrikosov Prize, International John Bardeen Prize, and a multiple recipient of the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1027],[206],[226],[225]

Magnetic Materials Processing and Physical Properties

The session will cover the processing techniques used in manufacturing components from ceramic superconductors, metallic supercondcutors and other magnetic materials. Areas of interest include

  • Casting, forming and machining
  • Additive processing and joining technologies
  • The evolution of material properties under the specific conditions met in manufacturing processes
  • Surface properties

Design and behavior of equipment and tools for the sample preparation and appropriate quantitative analysis with well designed experiments well covered in the session, which contribute significant new transferable knowledge in the form of (a) an innovation or (b) a new insight into material processing in the form of a transferable qualitative or quantitative explanation of a difference between experimental measurements and the predictions of relevant existing theories, models and hypothesis.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • TBA
Session Organizer/Moderator
Mehmet Ali Aksan

Prof. M.Ali AKSAN graduated in 1995 from the Physics Department of Inönü University. In 2003, he received a Ph.D. degree from the Institute of Natural and Applied Sciences of Inönü University Present employment: Full-time professor at Physics Department of Inönü University, TURKEY. Current fields of interest. Superconductors, superconducting Josephson Junction, glass-ceramic materials, thermoelectricity and thermal conductivity, magnetic shape memory alloys. He has published more than 90 referred papers in the international journals. Prof. AKSAN is in the organization committee of the International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM) since 2018. He gave a number of invited talks at a few international conferences.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1004],[1008],[1050],[1054],[1288]

Magnetic Recording,Sensors and Microwave Devices

This session will mainly address recent progress on magnetic recording, sensors and microwave devices and technologies behind. Magnetic sensors, such as: magnetoresistors, magnetodiodes, Hall-effect devices, silicon depletion-layer magnetometers, magneto-injection transistors, magnistors, lateral magnetotransistors, carrier-domain magnetometers, MOS magnetic-field sensors, fluxgate magnetometers and search coils, etc. will be main topics. Recent progress on the field and the novel applications of these sensors to different areas of technology (medical, defense, space, navigation, geology, etc.) will be elaborated.
The most recent tools and ways of magnetic recording and reading with increased capacity of data storage, studies on magnetic imaging methods (e.g. low-field open NMR) and up to date developments on the electronic background, instrumentation and measurements in the field are specifically encouraged for presentation in this session.
The session additionally will cover spintronics devices (magnetic tunnel junctions, GMR devices, spin injection/detection in semiconductors, spin LEDs, optical isolators and optical switches), circuit applications (nonvolatile memory and logic), quantum information processing utilizing spin states, spin transfer torque dynamics and applications (e.g. Spin-transfer torque random-access memory (STT-RAM)).
You are kindly invited to join these fruitful discussions.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Magnetic imaging and recording ( from spintronic devices to MRI, MFM, magnetooptics, etc., to magnetic shielding and noise measurements)
• Magnetic sensors and applications (GMI, GMR, Fluxgate, Search coil, Hall effect magnetometers, etc., measurement and instrumentations techniques)
• Space magnetometry and magnetic navigation systems
• Magnetic microwave devices (spin transfer torque, switching, oscillator, applications to magnetic sensors and magnetic random access memory, spin Hall Effect devices, etc.)

Session Organizer/Moderator
Peter Švec, Ugur Topal

Peter Švec, DrSc. (principal investigator, head of Department of Metal Physics IP SAS) is specialist for TEM and XRD. His scientific activities are focused on the investigation of the formation and stability of amorphous and nanocrystalline structures in rapidly quenched metallic systems. His focus is also applications of rapidly quenched amorphous and nanocrystalline alloys in energetics and advanced sensors of physical properties, especially deformation and field sensors and in power engineering.

 

 

 

Ugur Topal received his PhD in physics in 2003 from Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey. After working as a research assistant at Abant Izzet Baysal University for 4 years, he joined National Metrology Institute (UME) of Turkey in 1999. He is still working in UME as a senior scientist. His research interests include synthesis and characterization of magnetic and superconducting materials, their potential applications in industry, magnetic sensor technologies and functional materials, Attitude and control determination sensors and actuators of low-medium orbit Satellites.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

 

Superconducting, Magnetic, Topological Arsenides and Tellurides

The focus of this session is on comprehensive studies of arsenide and telluride layered superconductors, and/or magnetically  ordered materials –  a rich family of topologically non-trivial insulators and semimetals. We will discuss their unusual  physical properties, energy band structure, superconducting order parameters, charge transport, underlying physical mechanism, and concepts.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Magnetically ordered topological insulators and semimetals
• Magnetically ordered superconductors
• Interplay of superconducting pairing and magnetic ordering
• Charge transport in the AFM-ordered topological materials

Session Organizer/Moderator
Vladimir Pudalov

Vladimir Pudalov is a principle researcher, head of the V.L. Ginzburg Center for High Tc Superconductivity and Quantum Materials at Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow. He received his PhD (1975) and habilitation (1985) from Kapitza Institute in Moscow. Since 1998 he is working at P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute. His research at LPI is focused on the physics of new high temperature superconductors, topological materials, and strongly correlated low-dimensional electron system.

Invited speakers include:

Tatiana E. Kuzmicheva (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia )
Pavel D. Grigoriev (L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Russia )
Nikita S. Pavlov (Institute for Electrophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia )
Alena Yu. Degtyarenko (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia)

Abstract IDs: 

[1191],[1198],[1225],[1261]

Graphene and 2D Materials (2DM) – Experimental Session

In this session, the experimental aspects and new approaches to synthesize and characterize graphene and other new families of 2D materials will be presented. Current knowledge on the physical properties of graphene and related 2D materials will be expanded by various experimental methods and possible usage of such materials on devices will be discussed. In particular important issues such as synthesis, defect structures, conductivity, magnetism, superconductivity, quantum confinement effects, the dependence of the energy gap on thickness and strain, the multi-orbital character of the electronic state and the effect of the strong spin-orbit coupling will be discussed through various experimental approaches. Recently, it is reported that Moiré patterns formed with twisted bilayer graphene have a strong influence on the electronic properties of the graphene material. The main reason is that the Moiré pattern slows down the electrons that conduct electricity in graphene and zip past each other at great speeds. At a twist angle of about 1.1 degrees -the so-called magic angle- these electrons come to an almost zero velocity. The slow-moving electrons start seeing each other and interact with their surround to move in lock-step. As a result, the graphene acquires interesting peculiarities such as superconductivity or magnetism. Such magic angles may also exist in 2D materials thus new superconductive materials can be found via twisted bilayers. Therefore in this session, it is also hoped that some new possibilities or developments with these materials will be put forward.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Fundamental experimental research on Graphene and 2DM
  • Defect structures in Graphene and 2DM
  • Spectroscopic characterization of Graphene and 2DM
  • Graphene and 2DM based device fabrication Superconductivity in Graphene and 2DM
Session Organizer/Moderator
Emre Erdem

Dr Emre Erdem is now associate professor at Sabanci University, Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Materials Science and Nano Engineering program (Istanbul / Turkey).  In 2010, he became a research group leader in the Institute of Physical Chemistry at the University of Freiburg on the spectroscopic studies of functional nanomaterials. Emre has a strong background in diverse  fields, such as materials physics and chemistry, physical chemistry, atomic physics, solid-state physics, defect chemistry, studies of electronic properties of energy materials and the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystals (functional nanomaterials,  piezoelectrics,  supercapacitors  and,  in  particular,  semi-conducting  quantum  dots).  He was awarded LE STUDIUM / Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellowship (2017), Eugen Grätz Prize (2011) and DAAD scholarship (1999).

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1298],[230]

Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence(AI) with ab initio calculations

Ab initio (or “first principles”) calculations play an essential role in Quantum Materials Modelling. The key advantages are accuracy and transferability, i.e.that the answers obtained are good and reliable in a wide range of different contexts. The downside is the computational cost required, which limits this approach in system size and time scale and often requires access to high-performance computing facilities. This contrasts with the traditional force-field approach, wherein “chemical intuition” is used to create the functional form of how energy varies with atomic position, and this is then parameterized by fitting to a mix of experimental data and/or ab initio results. The force-field approach is much faster to apply once it has been created but is limited in accuracy (it typically knows nothing about electrons) and transferability (it typically only works near the state point(s) it was parameterized to and is not transferable to new materials). The ML and AI approaches offer new ways of approaching the problem of materials modeling, with (typically) near-ab initio accuracy and near-force-field speed. There are a variety of different approaches being developed, and in this session, we will explore some of them, to learn more about their strengths and weaknesses.

 

 

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • TBA
Session Organizer/Moderator
Matt Probert

He is a Professor in the School of Physics, Engineering and Technology and a member of the Condensed Matter and Materials Physics group. He is the Director of the N8 Centre of Excellence for Computationally Intensive Research (N8-CIR). He is the chair of UKCP and one of the core developers of the CASTEP computer program.Here you will find details about Matt Probert personal research interests and the activities of his research group and some lecture notes relevant to my teaching.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

 

 

High Temperature Superconductors for fusion applications

The key enabling technology for the development of compact fusion reactor is that of High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) tapes, which can generate the high magnetic fields necessary for the development of compact fusion reactors.
However, the development of these materials is far from complete, and several challenges are still to be faced, in particular:
– technology of HTS cables and magnets for fusion
– HTS thermal stability and quenching under fusion conditions
– fusion radiation environment effects on HTS properties
In this session, speakers will focus on the topics above, providing a comprehensive picture of the paths that can be followed to optimize these materials and their use, in order to achieve the production of energy from fusion reactions.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • HTS technology
  • Irradiation effects
  • Fusion magnets
Session Organizer/Moderator
Daniele Torsello, Francesco Laviano, Giuseppe Celentano

Daniele Torsello is a Research Fellow at Politecnico di Torino, where he received his Ph.D. in Physics in 2020. His research is focused on the investigation of the response of superconductors to crystallographic disorder caused by high energy particle irradiation. These studies are aimed to: i) the understanding of the fundamental mechanism of superconductivity in novel materials such as Fe-based superconductors, 2) the optimization of vortex pinning in practical superconductors, and 3) the investigation of the radiation hardness of high-temperature superconductors for fusion applications.

Francesco Laviano is Associated Professor of Experimental Physics at Politecnico di Torino and received his Ph.D. in Physics in 2005. His recent research activity is mainly devoted to exploiting superconducting materials for renewable-energy applications. In particular, his team is currently studying the radiation effects on high temperature superconductors in view of their use in high field magnets for confining the plasma in compact nuclear fusion reactors.

 

Giuseppe Celentano, physicist, is a researcher at the Superconductivity Laboratory of ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development) since 2000. His field of interest are the physics and technology of superconducting YBCO thin films and multilayer epitaxial structures on metallic substrates for the development of coated conductor technology. In the last decade, he started working on the development of HTS conductors for fusion magnets based on REBCO coated conductors.

Invited speakers include:

Daniele Torsello (Politecnico di Torino, Italy)
Giuseppe Celentano (ENEA, Italy)
Sergey Lee (Faraday Factory Japan LLC, Japan)
Nicolò Riva (Proxima Fusion, Germany)
Raphael Unterrainer (TU Wien Atominstitut, Austria)
Chao Zhou (Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China)
David Fischer (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA)

Abstract IDs: 

[1153],[1159],[1178],[1309],[1312],[1316],[1321],[1323]

 

Iron Based Superconductors (IBS): Fundamental and Applied Research under Ambient and Applied Pressures

Iron-based superconductors (IBS) offer an excellent material platform for conducting basic and practical research. The highest transition temperature (Tc) of 58 K, high upper critical field (Hc2) of ~100 T, and high critical current density (Jc) of 107-108 A/cm2 have been reported for IBS. More than 100 compounds belong to this high-Tc superconductor that can be categorized into six families based on the structure of the parent compounds: REFeAsO (RE1111; RE = rare earth), AFe2As2 (122; A = Ba, K, Ca), (Li/Na)FeAs (111), AEAFe4As4 (1144; AE = Ca, Eu; A = K, Rb), thick perovskite-type oxide blocking layers, such as Sr4V2O6Fe2As2 (22456), Sr4Sc2O6Fe2P2 (42622), etc., and chalcogenide FeX representing 11 (X = chalcogenide). The 1111 and 1144 families are the two most significant families of IBS, which offer high Tc of 58 and 36 K with (as a doped system) and without doping (as a stoichiometric system), respectively. After 15 years of discovery, there are still many challenges with these high Tc IBS materials. This session focuses on two main themes of discussion: 1) Current exciting investigations and findings for IBS regarding the physical, structural, thermodynamic and magnetic properties from characterization measurements as well as the material properties aspects 2) Study and comprehend the high-pressure effects on the growth, electronic structure, electron-phonon interaction and superconducting characteristics of IBS and its development under extreme conditions.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Growth process of IBS at ambient and applied pressure: Polycrystalline, single crystal, and thin films
  • Current progress and exciting research results of IBS
  • Flux pinning, grain boundaries, and critical current properties in extreme conditions with pressure and strain
  • Fabrication of bulks, wires, and tapes under ambient and high-pressure conditions
  • Fabrication of bulk and investigation of the trapped magnetic field
Session Organizer/Moderator
Shiv Singh

Shiv Singh has been an assistant professor at the Institute of High-Pressure Physics (UNIPRESS), Warsaw Poland, since January 2020. He completed his Ph. D. (Physics) at Jawaharlal Nehru University (JNU), New Delhi India, in 2012. Prior to joining UNIPRESS, Dr. Singh was a research staff at the Department of Physics, Oxford University, Oxford UK from 2017 to 2019. Before that, Dr. Singh worked as a JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion of Science) Fellow at the University of Tokyo, Japan; a DAAD (German Academic Exchange Service) Fellow at Leibniz Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW) Dresden Germany; and an institute fellow at Muroran Institute of Technology Japan. Dr. Singh is interested in the growth process, physical and magnetic characterization of iron-based superconductors under ambient and high-pressure conditions. He is also interested in the fabrication of superconducting wires and tapes for the magnet application. Details about his research activities can be found here (https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5769-1787 ).

Invited speakers include:

Bernd Büchner (IFW Dresden, Germany)
Cedomir Petrovic (Shanghai Advanced Research in Physical Sciences, China)
Hiraku Ogino (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan)
Adrian Crisan (National Institute for Materials Physics, Romania)

Abstract IDs: 

[1383],[1076],[1023],[1030],[1193],[1199],[1209],[1301],[1310]

Role of Superconductivity Roadmap For Net Zero Carbon Emission Targets by 2050: Superconductivity Global Alliance (ScGA)

The Superconductivity Global Alliance (ScGA) is a collective initiative dedicated to advancing the understanding and application of superconductivity toward a greener, healthier, more prosperous, and sustainable future. To harness the enormous potential of superconductors in addressing our societal future needs, new thinking and innovations are needed to translate demonstrator devices into successful market applications. At the heart of this process, we propose to establish a three-way partnership. ScGA vision: Superconductivity provides a pathway to achieving zero-emission targets by enabling fusion power, expanding usage of wind power, facilitating zero-emission transportation, as well as enabling innovative technologies such as low energy superconducting classical and quantum computing, water purification, new medical diagnosis and therapy tools, and new scientific breakthroughs.

This session will focus on presenting the status of the development of superconducting solutions to address the net zero carbon emission targets by 2050. The presentations will include a panel discussion on the ScGA status on grand challenges and the proposed strategic roadmaps and will include invited talks on superconducting technologies for Fusion, Renewables, Transmission Lines, Storage, and Transport and related technologies as well as the role of hydrogen together with superconductors in addressing selected challenges.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Superconducting Magnet Applications for Fusion Reactors
  • Advances in Superconductor Generators for Wind Turbines
  • Superconducting Transmission Lines
  • Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES)
  • Fault Current Limiters in Renewables
  • Superconductor Applications for Aviation
  • Superconducting Maglev Applications
  • Magnetic Separation for Materials in Water Purification
  • Superconductor Applications for Hydrogen as a Fuel and Coolant
Session Organizer/Moderator
Ziad Melhem

Professor Ziad Melhem is the Founder and CEO of Oxford Quantum Solutions Ltd (OQS). OQS is an independent Consultancy Business launched in Feb 2021 focusing on Innovations and Advanced Solutions, Strategic Business Development, Executive Mentoring, Strategic Road mapping, and Technical Authority on Superconducting, Cryogenics, Instrumentation in Quantum and Nanotechnology applications for Quantum, Energy, Life Sciences, Physical Sciences, Transport and Power Applications. From 1st Dec 2022, Ziad has been appointed as a Professor at the Physics Department, Lancaster University with a particular focus on Business Development and Technology Transfer of Advanced Technologies in Low-Temperature Cryogenics, Condensed Matter, Superconducting Devices, and Quantum Technologies for diverse sectors. Since 1st Jan 2022, Ziad has been a Non-Executive Director for Intelliconnect Europe Ltd, focusing on product development of solutions for Quantum Technologies. Before retiring from Oxford Instruments NanoScience (OINS), Ziad, the Strategic Business Development Manager, managed OINS Strategic Business Development activities, Alliances, and Collaborative R&D projects on quantum, nanoscience, and nanotechnology applications.

Ziad has over 34 years of experience in product, partnerships, alliances, and business development activities in applied superconductivity, Low and High-temperature superconducting (LTS & HTS) materials, cryogenics, advanced instrumentation, quantum, and nanotechnology applications for scientific, medical, physical and life sciences, energy, and industrial sectors.

Ziad is the Chairman of the British Cryogenic Council (BCC), a member of the IOP Superconductivity Group, a Chairman of the IOP Superconductivity Summer School series in Oxford, a Member of the International Organizing Committee of the Magnet Technology Conference series, and Coordinator of the Superconductivity Global Alliance (ScGA). Ziad is active at the national and international levels and is a member of a variety of international and national committees and organizations and sits on Advisory Boards for different projects and initiatives on superconducting, quantum, and cryogenic applications.

Invited speakers include:

Sastry Pamidi (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Florida, USA)
Xiaoze Pei (University of Bath, UK)
Kohei Higashikawa (Kyushu University, Japan)
Hiroyuki Ohsaki (University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, Kashiwa 277-8561, Japan)
Mike Halsall (ETR & Digital Commons, Cambridge, UK)
Marco Breschi (University of Bologna, Italy)
Sasha Ishmael (VEIR Inc., 01801, Woburn, United States of America )
Hongye Zhang (School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK)
Takanobu Kiss (Kyushu University, Japan)

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

 

Quantum Transport and Novel Broken Symmetry Ground States

The field of quantum transport, with its broad set of formalisms and experimental techniques, provides a valuable connection between experimental observables and physical properties of electronic ground states. Among such systems, our focus is set on the novel broken symmetry ground states such as: exotic superconductivity, charge ordering outside of standard nesting model, nontrivial topological materials etc.

The other aspect of quantum transport we focus on is realized in heterostructures of different types. Among them we single out just few examples: different types of normal and superconducting mesoscopic weak links, interfaces between systems in different ground states and/or topology, manipulation of collective modes in heterostructures, etc.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Extended Drude model and memory function
  • Optical- and magneto-conductivity
  • Dirac and Weyl semimetals
  • Topological materials and their junctions
  • Exotic and topological superconductivity
  • Charge ordering in quasi-2D systems with closed Fermi surface
  • Normal, magnetic and superconducting mesoscopic heterostructures
  • Nanoelectromechanical weak links
Session Organizer/Moderator
Danko Radić – Zoran Rukelj

Prof. Danko Radić works in the field of theoretical condensed matter physics at the University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science (PMF), Croatia. His research interests cover systems of anomalous dimensionality with broken symmetry ground state (charge and spin density waves), theory of phase transitions, nonlinear physics, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), NEMS qubits and quantum information. He keeps active collaborations are with the Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon, Korea, Chalmers University of Technology and University of Gothenburg, Sweden and Ruhr Universität Bochum, Germany.

 

 

 

The current scientific interest of Assistant professor Zoran Rukelj (University of Zagreb, Faculty of Science) is focused on the study of charge transport. This includes intraband and interband single- particle excitations as well as collective charge excitations such as excitons and plasmons in systems like quasi-two dimensional conductors, insulators and heterostructures, Dirac and Weyl semimetals, etc. The used techniques revolve around the semiclassical transport equations with the generalised energy and momentum dependent scattering within the so called memory function formalism.

Invited speakers include:

Igor Herbut (Simon Fraser University, Canada)
Sergei Ovchinnikov (Kirensky Institute of Physics, Russia)
Dino Novko (Institute of Physics, Zagreb, Croatia)
Damjan Pelc (University of Zagreb Faculty of Science, Zagreb, Croatia)
Xi Dai (The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China)
Hee Chul Park (Department of Physics, Pukyong National University, Busan, 48513, Republic of Korea)
Antonio Strkalj (University of Zagreb Faculty of Science, Zagreb, Croatia)
Nina Marković (Goucher College, Baltimore, MD, USA)
Junho Suh (Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673, Republic of Korea)
Vito Despoja (Institute of Physics, Zagreb, Croatia)

Abstract IDs: 

[1371],[1026],[1241],[1242],[1355],[1359],[1371],[240]

Advanced REBCO-based conductors for large-scale HTS applications

High-performance, low-cost, high-temperature superconducting (HTS) REBCO tapes or coated conductors have the potential to revolutionize many energy-related applications and could have major implications in the energy transition towards clean and renewable energy generation, storage, transmission and use in large-scale electric devices. These coated conductors are enabling for applications such as commercial nuclear fusion, superconducting cables for the electric grid, electric aviation, and superconductor-based electric generators/motors, etc. This symposium or focused session will highlight talks from leading REBCO wire manufacturers and focus on REBCO wire performance in applied magnetic fields, cost, thruput, yield, etc.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• TBA

Session Organizer/Moderator
Amit Goyal

Amit Goyal is a SUNY Distinguished Professor and a SUNY Empire Innovation Professor at SUNY-Buffalo. He is a leading scientist in the field of advanced electronic and energy materials, including High Temperature Superconductors. He has over 85 issued patents and over 350 publications. He leads the Laboratory for Heteroepitaxial Growth of Functional Materials & Devices and is the Director of the New York State Center of Excellence in Plastics Recycling Research & Innovation, an externally funded center with initial funding of $4.5M for three years at SUNY-Buffalo. He was also the founding director of the RENEW Institute, a multidisciplinary and transdisciplinary research institute at SUNY-Buffalo. For his contributions to UB, he was awarded the University at Buffalo or SUNY-Buffalo President’s Medal in 2019, which recognizes “outstanding scholarly or artistic achievements, humanitarian acts, contributions of time or treasure, exemplary leadership or any other major contribution to the development of the University at Buffalo and the quality of life in the UB community”. This is one of the highest recognitions given at the university.

He is a member of the National Materials and Manufacturing Board of the US National Academies. He is also presently an Emeritus Corporate Fellow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Goyal was previously a UT-Battelle Corporate Fellow, a Battelle Distinguished Inventor and an ORNL Distinguished Scientist at Oak Ridge National Laboratories in Tennessee. He was also the chair of the UT-Battelle-ORNL Corporate Fellow Council.

Invited speakers include:

Alexander Molodyk (Faraday Factory, Japan)
Yasuhiro Iijima (Fujikura Ltd. Japan)
Sergey Lee (Faraday Factory Japan LLC, Japan)
Venkat Selvamanickam (The University of Houston, USA)
Seung Hyun Moon (SuNAM Co. Ltd., South Korea)
Yutaka Yamada (Shanghai Superconductor Technology Co., Ltd, , China)
Daniel McGahn (American Superconductor Corporation AMSC, USA)
Laurent Pilon (Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA‑E) HTS Wire Program (DOE-ARPA-E), USA)

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Magnetism of Nanoparticles, Nano-Wires and Nano-Structures

Interest in nanotechnologies and nanoscale materials, particularly magnetic nanomaterials, has grown recently and their applications have attracted the attention of both the research and industrial communities in the biomedical, environmental, clinical, energy and technological applications owing to their many unique properties.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Synthesis and Characterization of Magnetic Nanomaterials
• Magnetic Properties
• Biomedical Applications
• Energy and Technological Applications of Magnetic Nanomaterials

Session Organizer/Moderator
Hakan Köckar

Hakan Köckar is a Professor at Balıkesir University. He received his Ph. D. in 1998 from the University of Wales Cardiff.

Details about his research activities can be found here;

http://w3.balikesir.edu.tr/~nanomanyetizma/index_dosyalar/Page435.html

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1319],[1351]

 

Numerical Modelling of Superconducting Materials and Applications

Over the past decade, significant advances have been made by the superconducting modeling community [1] to develop various numerical models to analyze the performance of superconducting materials for a variety of practical engineering devices and applications. With strong support from the superconductor modeling community, a series international workshop dedicated to the numerical modeling of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials has been organized since 2010. Numerical models are powerful tools for investigating the electromagnetic, mechanical and thermal properties of superconducting materials in various configurations coils, cables, transformers, and rotating machines, as well as bulk superconducting materials and pseudo-bulk stacks of superconducting tape acting as powerful, trapped field magnets(TEMs). The modeling of HTS materials, in particular, has unique challenges that must incorporate very complex behavior due to extreme nonlinearity and hysteresis, strong anisotropy, temperature dependence, relaxation, and high aspect ratio and complex composite structure of practical wires and tapes. Such complex behavior raises new challenges in the development of reliable modeling tools and requires a specialized research effort to effectively deal with these problems.
[1] HTS Modelling Workgroup http://www.htsmodelling.com/

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Numerical Modeling on Superconductor
  • Bulk Superconductors
  • Coated Conductors
  • High-Tc Cuprates
  • Thermal , Magnetic and Electrical Properties of Superconductors
  • AC losses in superconductors
  • Power Applications of Superconductors
  • Power Cables
  • Superconductor Fault Current Limiters: Principles and Practice
  • Cryogenic Engineering Modelling
Session Organizer/Moderator
Min Zhang

Min Zhang is a senior scientist (Reader) in the University of Strathclyde, Electrical Engineering Division, in UK since 2018. She received his Ph. D. in 2013 from the Dept. of Engineering, the University of Cambridge. Her PhD work on second generation high temperature superconducting coils received the IET Postgraduate Prize in 2013. She was a Junior Research Fellowship of Newnham College at the University of Cambridge in 2014. She is an editor in IEEE Transactions on Applied Superconductivity. She has received many international awards including the latest one The Jan Evetts Superconductor Science and Technology Award, 2017 and 2019. She has published many research papers and patents for realistic applications of superconductors. She has attended many international conferences delivered speeches and invited talks. Her research mainly focuses on large-scale applications of HTS materials, including HTS machines, fault current limiters and HTS high field magnets. Her expertise lies in both modelling and experimental characterisation.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Fe-Based Superconductors: Growth and Properties Relevant to Applications

Fe-based superconductors (FBS) discovered in 2008 have significant potential for high field magnet applications thanks to their high upper critical field and its low electromagnetic anisotropy. Several research groups have already demonstrated FBS wires, tapes and bulks as proof-of-principle studies for conductor and magnet applications. However, even after 15 years of research, crystal and thin film growth still remains challenging in some of the systems. In this session, the recent development and advances in the processing of FBS wires, tapes, and bulk magnets, involving processing and materials properties will be covered.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Processing of pnictide single crystals, thin films and bulk superconductors
  • Grain boundary issues for pnictide
  • Improvement of critical current properties by introduction of pinning for pnictide
  • Applications of pnictide bulks, including trapped field magnets
Session Organizer/Moderator
Iida Kazumasa

Kazumasa Iida was appointed as a full professor at Nihon University, Japan in 2022. He received the doctor of engineering from Nagoya University in 2003. He spent the University of Cambridge from 2004 to 2007 as a postdoctoral researcher under the supervision of Prof. David A Cardwell. After spending 3.5 years in Cambridge, he joined the group led by Prof. Bernhard Holzapfel at the IFW Dresden as a senior scientist. He was appointed as an associate professor at Nagoya University in 2014. His research experience covers a wide range of materials, involving the fabrication of Sr-ferrite magnets, the growth of garnet films for magneto-optical imaging, and the growth of HTS and Fe-based superconducting materials in the form of bulk and thin films

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

This session has been merged with “Superconductivity and Magnetism in Heavy Fermion Systems” session!

Novel Phases in Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

Strongly correlated electron systems have proven to provide a fertile ground from which new concepts and new challenges have grown. The session on “Novel Phases in strongly correlated electron systems” emphasizes the fundamental physics of electron correlations that often produce new states of matter, an exciting frontier in condensed matter physics. The main topics include, but are not limited to, heavy fermion, unconventional superconductivity, and quantum phase transition. Synthesis of new materials that show strongly correlated behavior will be also emphasized.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Heavy fermion
• Unconventional superconductivity
• Quantum phase transiton
• Topological Kondo physics
• New Materials

Session Organizer/Moderator
Tuson Park

2013-present: Director of the Center for Quantum Materials and Superconductivity Sungkyunkwan University, Korea

2008-present: Professor, Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Korea

2016- present: Fellow of Korean Physical Society

(http://cqms.skku.edu)

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1082],[1352],[229]

Theory of Magnetism

The purpose of this session is to bring together the different scientists working from a theoretical point of view on magnetism and superconductivity. These are the different theories used today to understand, explain, and predict the different phenomena related to magnetism and superconductivity, such as first-principles methods. The session attempts to cover a broad spectrum of news material to shed light on the most important recent research.

 

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :
  • Theory of Magnetism
  • First Principles
  • Ab Initio Calculations
Session Organizer/Moderator
Ali Zaoui

Ali Zaoui has been a full professor of the Universities ( Polytech’Lille/ University of Lille1) since February 2005. He is an actual professor of Exceptional Class 2 ( maximum promotion of professor in France). He got his Ph.D. from the University of Metz. In September 1999 he was employed as a research associate at the INFM (National Institute of Matter Physics). Italy. He then joined the Max Planck Institute of Stuttgart, Germany. His research has been mainly dedicated to modeling and simulation methods based on ab initio, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo. They cover a wide range of materials including semiconductors metals, ceramics, clathrates, energetic materials, geomaterials (rocks, clays,…) nanocomposites.. In addition, several of his works focused mainly on magnetism. He has published over 170 papers in international journals.

 

Invited speakers include:

Izumi Hase National (Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology(AIST), Japan)
Swagata Acharya (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, 80401, CO, USA)

Abstract IDs: 

[1083],[1160],[1294],[215]

Quantum Functional Materials and Their Emerging Technologies

Quantum technology is a new and advanced area of physics and engineering, based on the use of some of the phenomena in quantum mechanics, such as quantum entanglement, quantum superposition, and quantum tunneling and interference effects for practical applications such as quantum computing, quantum materials, quantum sensing, quantum cryptography, high precision quantum metrology, and quantum imaging.

The progress made in condensed matter physics during the last two decades leads to discovery principally new phenomena and engineering of advanced functional materials which may play a crucial role in the developments in modern science and technology. Especially, this concerns a relatively new area, quantum technology which is based on the use of quantum phenomena in the functionalization of advanced nanoscale materials. It is commonly believed that low-dimensional quantum functional materials such as graphene, topological insulators, novel superconductors, quantum sensors, and quantum spin liquids may replace in near future traditional ones in electronic, optical and mechanical devices by increasing their energy- and resource-saving efficiency, durability, making them maximally compact, flexible and environmentally safe. Unusual properties of these materials make possible realization and practical utilization of new quantum phenomena related to underlying fundamental phenomena such as topological effects, relativistic-like behavior (in graphene and Majorana fermions), disorder and coherence effects, quantum transport, etc. Fabrication of new materials and devices requires the study of such effects and tuning of the physical properties of these materials.

Sessions Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Dirac and Weyl semimetals
• Topological Insulators
• Graphene and other 2D materials
• Majorana fermions
• Kitaev chains
• Topological superconductors
• Quantum metrology
• Quantum networks
• Physics infiormed machine learning

Session Organizer/Moderator
Davron Matrasulov

TBA

 

 

 

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

Quantum Error Mitigation

Current quantum hardware for information processing is prone to errors, limiting the complexity of computations that can be performed. Traditional error mitigation techniques have involved encoding the logical quantum information content of a single qubit in an array of physical qubits— the surface code and the toric code being examples of qubits on a square grid or more complex graph in the case of the latter. More recently, designs have been proposed requiring a smaller number of physical qubits, and architectures which are hardware efficient and protect against only the most prevalent of errors. Additionally, noise suppression techniques have been developed where the processing capacity of quantum hardware can be enhanced by tailoring one type of noise into another. This session explores the different modalities of quantum error mitigation currently being developed and highlights open challenges in the field.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

TBA

Session Organizer/Moderator
Irfan Siddiqi

Irfan Siddiqi received his AB (1997) in chemistry & physics from Harvard University. He then went on to receive a PhD (2002) in applied physics from Yale University, where he stayed as a postdoctoral researcher until 2005. Irfan joined the physics department at the University of California, Berkeley in the summer of 2006. In 2006, Irfan was awarded the George E. Valley, Jr. prize by the American Physical Society for the development of the Josephson bifurcation amplifier. In 2007, he was awarded the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the Hellman Family Faculty Fund, and the UC Berkeley Chancellor’s Partnership Faculty Fund.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

TBA

This session has been merged with “Molecular Spin Qubits toward Quantum Computer” session!

New Phenomena and Applications in Molecular Magnets

Molecular based magnets have generated intense interest in recent years because of the technological possibilities that they suggest in so-called Molecular Spintronics. These are materials that combine some of the intrinsic properties of molecular solids(nanoscopic size, low density, synthetic versatility, optical transparency and so on) with the presence of one or more physical properties of practical utility. Among the properties that have stimulated the greatest interest, we can highlight optical as well as electrical and magnetic properties – regardless of whether the latter be cooperative ( such as ferromagnetism or superconductivity) or non-cooperative (superparamagnetism spin glass). The system that generates the greatest attention are those molecular materials that can be converted reversibly between two states, with concomitant variations in some of the properties of interest, under the action of an external stimulus such as light, pressure, temperature or electric or magnetic fields. Recently materials have been obtained which combine electric and magnetic properties (molecular multiferroics) optical and magnetic properties, and even magnetic properties in systems with intramolecular electron transfer. It could be expected that in these multifunctional materials a mutual. The influence could exist-a synergy- between the properties involved, making possible the development of nanoscopic devices such as molecular switches or spin filters.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Organic superconductors
• Carbon Based Superconductivity
• Molecular Magnetism
• Carbon based magnetism and grapheme
• Low dimensional magnetism
• Novel functional magnetic materials: Basic approach and applications
• Molecular Spintronics
• Molecular refrigeration
• Quantum Computation

Session Organizer/Moderator
Javier Campo, Yuko Hosokoshi

Prof. Javier Campo, is a scientist at the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Director of the Materials Science Institute of Aragon( ICMA), in Zaragoza, Spain. He got his Ph.D. at the University of Zaragoza and his thesis dealt with the magnetism of disordered materials. After that, Dr. Campo did a postdoctoral stay for two years at the University of Montpelier (France) where he specialized in the magneto-optical properties of the GaN. After he moved to the Institute Laue Langevin (Grenoble, France) for more than 5 years. At that moment he started to study molecular magnets employing neutron scattering techniques. In 2002 he returned to Spain and currently Dr. Javier Campo’s researches focus on chirality concepts applied to magnetism. He was vice-chairman of the European Neutron Scattering Association and Chairman of the Spanish Neutron Scattering Society. Recently he organized VI. European Conference on Neutron Scattering in Zaragoza.

Prof. Dr. Yuko Hosokoshi  is a scientist at the Osaka Prefecture University College of Technology. Her research fiels are Organic Radicals, Low-dimensional Magnets, Quantum Spin Systems, Magnetic Suscepfibiling, Crystal Structure, Low Temperature, Magnetic Field, Hight Pressure, Magnetism.

Invited speakers include:

TBA

Abstract IDs: 

[1125],[1161],[1205],[1338],[1349]

Large scale facilities in magnetism, superconductivity and energy related materials

Analitical large scale research facilities (synchrotrons, neutron and muon sources) are employed in a huge number of experiments in magnetism, superconductivity and energy related materials. In fact these techniques are called “transversal” techniques because are employed to solve scientific problems not only in physics, chemistry or materials science, but in many other scientific disciplines (geology, biology, cultural heritage, ingeeniering, biotecnology, etc…).
In this session we inted to gather the contributions that apply these techniques to solve many different problems in magnetism, superconductivity and energy related materials (in situ experiments in batteries, dispersion curves in low dimensional magnets, magnetic structures in bulk and multilayer materials, difussion phenomena in batteries, hidden gaps in superconductors, spin densities in molecular magnets, etc…) and in many different kind of materials (multiferroics, molecular magnets, batteries, superconductors, spin ices, Kagomé layers, 2D materials, magneto and electro caloric materials, catalizers, magnetic skyrmions and solitons, zeolites, SOFC electrolisers, etc….)

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Synchrotron X ray scattering
• Neutron Scattering
• Muon Spin rotation
• SANS and SAXS
• Powder and single crystal neutron and Xray diffraction
• Polarized neutron diffraction
• Triple axis spectroscopy
• In situ experiments
• Inelastic X-ray scattering
• Resonant X-ray scattering
• Neutron sources
• Extreme conditions experiments
• Neutron and Xray reflectivity experiments
• Neutron and Xray imaging and tomography

Session Organizer/Moderator
Javier Campo, Kazuki Ohishi, Masaki Fujita

Prof. Javier CAMPO, made his doctoral thesis at the Aragón Materials Science Institute (ICMA), join research institute between the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) and the University of Zaragoza, in 1995. Later he moved to the University of Montpellier where he made a post-doctoral stay of 2 years. From 1998 to 2002 Dr J Campo was appointed by the CSIC as scientist responsible for the CRG-D1B at the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble (France). In 2003 he joined the ICMA as a researcher under the prestigious Spanish talent program “Ramón y Cajal” where he continued heading the Spanish CRGs at the ILL, including the CRG-D15 and the new XtremeD. He was Director of the ICMA from 2012 to 2020.
His scientific interest is focused on the study of “Magnetic Chirality” and “Purely organic magnets” by using neutron scattering techniques and recently he started to work on “in operando studies of materials for energy applications” by using also neutron scattering. He has held several international membership, among others; vice-presidency of the European Neutron Scattering Association (ENSA), Spanish delegate at the ILL Steering Committee, Chair of the VI European Conference on Neutron Scattering, and Chair of the Spanish Committee for Large Scale Research Facilities.

 

Prof. Kazuki OHISHI received his Ph.D. at Aoyama-Gakuin University in 2002, where he worked in the group of Prof. Jun Akimitsu. After studying magnetism and superconductivity using the µ+SR method as an experimental technique, he worked as a postdoctoral researcher at the Large Muon Experimental Facility, i.e., High Energy Accelerator Reserch Organization (KEK), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), and RIKEN, where he was engaged in research on magnetism and superconductivity, and experienced facility management and joint-use experiments. In particular, he received the Young Scientist Award from the Society of Muon and Meson Science of Japan for his work on chiral magnetism. In 2011, he joined the Neutron Science and Technology Center, CROSS and in charge of the small- and wide-angle neutron scattering instrument “TAIKAN” group at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility of J-PARC. He is engaged in research on magnetic structures such as chiral magnetic materials by small-angle neutron scattering. In 2019, he started to analyze battery materials using neutron scattering and muons. Recently, his group established an operando µ+SR experimental environment for charge-discharge processes and successfully measured ion diffusion in Li- and Na-ion batteries during charge-discharge processes.

 

Prof. Masaki FUJITA, accomplished his doctoral thesis at Kobe University in 1998. From 1998 to 2003, he was a researcher at the Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University. In 2003 he joined a neutron scattering group at the Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University. He has been managing this group as a full professor since 2014. He is the head of the Center of Neutron Science for Advanced Material at IMR and the chair of the Light/Quantum Beam Science Promotion Office, the Technical Committee at Tohoku University.
His research areas of expertise are “High-transition-temperature superconductivity,” “Spin dynamics of spintronics-related materials,” and “Physical properties of high-entropy materials.” He uses neutron scattering, synchrotron X-ray, and muon spin rotation techniques for the broad research. In addition, he is in charge of three neutron scattering instruments at the research reactor JRR-3, Japan.

Invited speakers include:

Alicia Manjon-Sanz (SNS/ORNL, USA)
Ping Miao (CSNS, China)
Arsen Gukasov (LLB CEA-CNRS, CE-Saclay, France)
Andrei Rogalev (ESRF, France)
Takashi Kamiyama (CSNS, China)
Valeria Blanco (Instituto de Nanociencia y Materiales de Aragón (INMA), Spain)
Kenji Kojima (Centre for Molecular and Materials Science (TRIUMF), Canada)
Pedro Alonso (Instituto de Nanociencia y Materiales de Aragón (INMA), Spain)
Satoshi Tsutsui (SPring-8, Japan)
Andrew Wildes (ILL, Grenoble, France)
Jun Sugiyama (CROSS Neutron Science and Technology Center, Japan)
Kazuki Ohishi (CROSS Neutron Science and Technology Center, Japan)
Masaki Fujita (Tohoku University, Japan)

Abstract IDs: 

 

Theory of Superconductivity

The aim of this session is to bring together the different scientists working in the area of theoretical descrşption of superconductivity. These are the different theories used today to understand, explain and predict the different properties of superconductivity, such as first-principles methods. The session attempts to cover a broad spectrum of news material and the anisotropy and multiband effects in new superconductors: cuprate superconductors, borocarbides, magnezium-diboride and oxypnictides.

Session Topics Include (but not limited to) :

• Multiband and anisotropic Ginzburg-Landau theory in application to new compounds
• Electron-boson coupling theory of superconductivity (BSC and Eliashberg theory)
• Theortetical description of superconductivity in strong correlated systems
• BCS-BEC crossover in new superconductors

Session Organizer/Moderator
Iman Askerzade

Iman Askerzade is a scientist in Ankara University, Turkey (since 2001). He received his Ph. D. in 1995 from the Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences and he was working in the Institute of Physics. His research is focused on theory of superconductivity including many-band Gizburg-Landau theory, Eliasgberg equations, Josephson Dynamics and superconducting qubits.

Invited speakers include:

Chi Ho Wong (Department of Physics, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong)

Abstract IDs: 

[1056],[1084],[1086],[1110],[1131],[1255],[1277],[1341],[216]